File deleuze-guattari/deleuze-guattari.0503, message 47


Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 13:54:44 +0100
Subject: Re: [D-G] find the d&g in this
To: deleuze-guattari-driftline.org-AT-lists.driftline.org


Hm, yes, old fashioned scientific. Classical mechanics was almost curse word
where I got my B.A. Anyhow, I understand where your point and I won't bother
going into some quantum-jabber about other neurological possibilities.

She *can* associate the music with taste afterwards, but it can also happen at
the same time. If she has an abnormal neurology (more than just being a
clinical synaesthete) she might even experience the taste before the music.
Clinical anaesthesia requires that the senses be connected or bypassed in some
peculiar and regular way, or that the barriers between them break down in a
regular way.

I'm sure if you removed the audial lobes in her brain and her ears then she
wouldn't be able to taste the music...or if she did taste something while music
 was playing it certainly wouldn't be music, or?

I find it more interesting, however, to compare this to what is considered
normal functioning of the brain and demonstrate how "the normal" is abnormal. 

Regards,
James Garrabrant



Citerar "Dr. Harald Wenk" <hwenk-AT-web.de>:

> Hello,
> 
> it maybe a little bit old fashioned scientific.
> But hearing is the interpretation of mechanical waves,
> that are molecular movements, mostly in the air, sometimes in water or  
> something other
> flui, gaz or solid. Now tasting is a chemical sense based on chemical  
> interactions
> in the tounge - differentiating bitter, sweet and sour. As you know, it is  
> not very fine, most taste comes from the nose.
> Now if she hears the musi, she can afterwards associate the audial  
> interpreted
> music with a taste. This is my eyes not tasting music.
> That would it be se tasted it with the ears closed.
> But I think, the matter is not really important.
> 
> Greetings
> 
> Harald Wenk
> 
> 

> Am Mon, 07 Mar 2005 19:23:50 +0100 schrieb <a03jamga-AT-student.his.se>:
> 
> > Citerar "Dr. Harald Wenk" <hwenk-AT-web.de>:
> >
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> do I interprete this right, thart she is only tasting the music if she
> >> hears it at the same time?
> >>
> >> Greetings
> >>
> >> Harald Wenk
> >
> > Normally, persons with clinical synaesthesia experience a combination of  
> > senses.
> > The clearer borders usually drawn between the five senses breaks down  
> > for them.
> > It is in reporting the taste of music that it seems peculiar to us,  
> > because, in
> > my opinion, the language we have to express it makes their experience  
> > seem
> > suspicious or imagined post facto, but the distinction between the  
> > senses is
> > imagined post facto.
> > .
> > Certain patients see music or letters in colors. Sometimes, for instance,
> > certain frequencies causes their entire visual field to be tinged with  
> > certain
> > colors. The color related to the frequency is almost always the same.  
> > Hence in
> > the article it says her "tone-interval identification was perfect". Other
> > patients have experienced seeing color in their peripheral vision when  
> > exposed
> > to certain stimulae. In the case of the patient below it seems that she  
> > hears
> > the tone, but that hearing also produces a taste. This is something  
> > almost all
> > of us can relate to, especially in altered states, but in synaesthetes  
> > the
> > sensation is much more specific. For the woman mentioned below her  
> > tastes could
> > be probably systematized so that she could produce music tablature for  
> > taste
> > rather than for sight-reading.
> >
> > Regards,
> > James Garrabrant
> >
> >>
> >> Am Thu, 3 Mar 2005 17:04:58 -0500 schrieb joan carol urquhart
> >> <jcu-AT-execulink.com>:
> >>
> >> > Report: Woman 'tastes' musical notes
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Thursday, March 3, 2005 Posted: 1:18 PM EST (1818 GMT)
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > LONDON, England (Reuters) -- Music can be a mouth-watering experience  
> >> for
> >> > one Swiss musician who "tastes" combinations of notes as distinct
> >> > flavors,
> >> > according to a report in the science journal Nature.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > The 27-year-old woman known as E.S. is a synaesthete, someone who
> >> > experiences sensation in more than one sense from the same  
> >> stimulation,
> >> > researchers said on Wednesday.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > When E.S. hears tone intervals, the difference in pitch between two
> >> > tones,
> >> > she not only can see the musical notes as different colors but can  
> >> taste
> >> > the
> >> > sounds.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "This is a special case of a musician who, when she hears tone  
> >> intervals,
> >> > she has a perception of a taste of a tone," said psychologist Michaela
> >> > Esslen, of the University of Zurich in Switzerland.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "She doesn't imagine the taste, she really tastes it."
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > The case of E.S. reported in Nature is exceptional because seeing
> >> > letters or
> >> > digits in a certain color is more common in synaesthesia.  It may also
> >> > involve seeing a musical tone as a color.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > But E.S. sees the colors and depending on the tone intervals a  
> >> symphony
> >> > could be bittersweet, salty, sour or creamy.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "Whenever she hears a specific musical interval, she automatically
> >> > experiences a taste on her tongue that is consistently linked to that
> >> > particular interval," the scientists said in the journal.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > They tested E.S.'s ability by applying solutions tasting sour, bitter,
> >> > salty
> >> > or sweet to her tongue and asking her to identify the tone intervals,  
> >> a
> >> > difficult task that requires musical training.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > When the applied tastes corresponded with the intervals she was able  
> >> to
> >> > identify them quicker than other musicians.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "We found that E.S.'s tone-interval identification was perfect," the
> >> > researchers said.
> >> >
> >> > _______________________________________________
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> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
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> >
> >
> >
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