File deleuze-guattari/deleuze-guattari.0810, message 32


To: <deleuze-guattari-AT-lists.driftline.org>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2008 21:19:45 +0200
Subject: Re: [D-G] Close reading : Bergson's conception of


Hello filip,

There are three examples:
1)
Atoms "graded" (ordered  as degree)
by atom weights, as in the table of chemical elements. They are  of
different nature.


2) Two daughter bacteria of a mother bacteria have the same "kind" and/or
"nature".
  2a) Human twins,  occurring in the introduction of "Difference and
Repetition as a "repetition as existence" of a notion.

3) The  air with different temperate in degrees in two rooms of the same
shape and size.

4) The repetition of a identical  lyric may have a different degree of
intensity.
    Remark, that for Deleuze you have some kind of subject or producer role
as a singularity of the thing repeated.
    Maybe the intensity of a feeling is the singularity of a repetition,
"producing"  the situation for the "re"feeling.

The critique of Deleuze on Bergson's critique on intensity is on page 307 of
the French issue of "Difference and repetition."
in Chapter 5,  "Differences of essences and differences of intensities" - It
is a bit elaborated.


greetings Harald Wenk

PS: I am very pleased  to hear something  of you again.
      You are cured in the meantime from your sickness?


-----Original Message-----
From: deleuze-guattari-bounces-AT-lists.driftline.org
[mailto:deleuze-guattari-bounces-AT-lists.driftline.org]On Behalf Of filip
Sent: Dienstag, 7. Oktober 2008 04:43
To: deleuze-guattari-AT-lists.driftline.org
Subject: Re: [D-G] Close reading : Bergson's conception of difference[1
paragraph]


1)What does deleuze mean by "differences of nature between things"

i think that by saying "differences of nature between things" Deleuze
wants to say that there exists (at least one)  a thing A that cannot be
reduced to thing B, in no way whatsoever. The nature or being of the
thing A is not gradually different, but radical from the nature of thing B

a)but if things have a nature, what is it, other then what makes them
that thing specifically?
b)if every thing has a nature, which makes it its self, how can you
compare ? then everything differs from everything ?
c)can anyone give an example (of things that differ from each other  (by
nature and by degree))


2)On the other hand, if the being of things is somehow in their differences
of nature, we can expect that difference itself is something, that it
has a nature,
that it will yield Being.

d)on the other hand: there is no implication, so Deleuze posits it just
like that ?
e)how can the being of things be in their differences of nature ?
if the being of things = the nature of the thing = what makes it that
thing = what is the essence of the thing then
it should be in theire differences of nature ?

I think deleuze wants to say that difference isn't only relational, but
also that difference is an "thing" , an entity, or
what could be called a tendency.

3)Why would a philosophy of difference work on two planes,
methodological and ontological?
a)I understand that it has its effects on the ontological side, but what
does he mean with methodological?
that we must first seek the difference of nature that allows us to
return to the thing itself, and then we will
see that difference is an entity ? or does he mean something more ?

thanks



filip schreef:
> The philosophy of Bergson,
> and inversely, Bergsonism promises to make an inestimable contribution
> to a
> philosophy of difference. Such a philosophy is always at work on two
> different
> planes: the one methodological, and the other ontological. On the one
> hand, we
> must determine the differences of nature between things: only in this
> way will
> we be able "to return" to the things themselves, to account for them
> without
> reducing them to something other than what they are, to grasp them in
> their
> being. On the other hand, if the being of things is somehow in their
> differences
> of nature, we can expect that difference itself is something, that it
> has a nature,
> that it will yield Being. These two problems, methodological and
> ontological,
> constantly echo one another: the problem of the differences of nature,
> the prob=AD
> lem of the nature of difference. In Bergson's work, we encounter these
> two
> problems in their connection, surprising them in their passage back
> and forth.
>
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