File puptcrit/puptcrit.0509, message 126


Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 13:24:31 EDT
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] teasers and tormentors
To: puptcrit-driftline.org-AT-lists.driftline.org


Hi Mathieu:

I was waiting for someone to ask what this was all about. If you know, you 
know.. Otherwise -???? 

Teasers and tormentors (also known as legs and borders) are the fabric 
masking panels (often black velour) used on stage to hide the various back stage 
mechanics associated with theatrical production from the audience. (Lights, 
actors, stuff, etc., etc.)
The borders (teasers) are   three or four feet   high   and are hung 
horizontally across the full width of the stage opening. The legs (tormentors) are 
hung vertically on either side of the stage opening immediately behind the 
borders and go from the stage floor up into the flys. They can be as wide as 
necessary, often 8' or so..

There are usually several sets of these used on stage and are usually 
referred to by number beginning from the proscenium arch back OR downstage to upstage 
with space as necessary in between each.
They can be fabric or solid panels (rare, and not at all practical for dance) 
or painted to establish a particular setting. These fall usually into the 
'scenery' category. 

Most borders (some are permanent) and legs are suspended from 'fly lines' and 
battens or pipes which allow them to be raised up into a 'fly loft,' the open 
housing built above the stage house proper. These counterbalanced lines are 
run to a 'fly rail'   on one side of the stage and can be locked at any 
position. 

Hope this helps...
Fred Thompson



creaturiste-AT-magma.ca writes:
> I'm curious to know what exactly they are, and why the heck are they called
> that!
> 
> All I think I know now is that they hide the lights.
> 

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