File puptcrit/puptcrit.0603, message 34


To: <puptcrit-AT-lists.driftline.org>
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 10:10:05 -0400
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Sealing the inside of masks (was: Info about Enamels)


I use wallpaer paste...sometimes add a little white glue. 4 
layers...newspaper, craft paper, newspaper, craft paper.
Same with all my pupppets.
Deborah
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mathieu René" <creaturiste-AT-magma.ca>
To: <puptcrit-AT-lists.driftline.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 5:53 PM
Subject: [Puptcrit] Sealing the inside of masks (was: Info about Enamels)


>Mathieu,
I have been making and performing with masks for the last 30 years. I don't
put anything on the inside of my masks. I live in Puerto Rico where we sweat
constantly and more so under a mask. I wire the edge of the mask and have
never had one disintergrate or even soften. I also like to see the newspares
I have used. I generally have one piece that has the date. Also I have made
masks in different countries, so the newspaper of that country is always a
reminder of the experience there. I have found that it is only galleries
that seem to be concerned about the inside finish.
Deborah Hunt
Puerto Rico
-------------------

Hi Liz!
I am impressed by your statements about Paper Mache in Puerto Rico.

What glues do you use with your newspaper?
How many layers are required to obtain the thickness and strenght you need?


And Hi all!

I must explain why I need to sceal the inside of my masks.
Most of them are used for theatre, and from my short experience I can tell
that these Actors are often hard on their masks.
My Care and Handling speech before I hand the mask to them is not a
guaranteed success. But I'm getting better at traumatizing them into
obediance and respect for their new face. The contrast with my regular
persona is startling at first.

Some masks are meant for schools, so they get worn by many people. I want to
be able to clean and sterilize the masks without dammage. Steam or alcohol
should work.
Human sweat absorbed and stored by any material eventually smells very
bad(bacterias), and can carry diseases.
I don't want to make plague-spreading masks!

For these reasons, the inner sealing needs to be permanent, it should not
crack (my masks are totally stiff, so that's less of a problem), it should
not cause skin reactions. The shiny feeling is not a problem with me. As Liz
mentionned, I can add a removeable terry cloth. I have made one masks with
that, and I like that cushion-y feeling.

So far, I've been sealing with multiple layers of Weldbond (a kind of
superior white glue), but it is not enough.
Eventually, the sides of the paper, especially where it covers the wire
outline, gets damaged, mostly the paint job,  and needs some touch-ups.
Knowing some actors and companies, the touch ups "can wait", they "don't
mind" and they let the problems accumulate.


I've also been thinking about using other types of sealers, such as pure
beeswax (applied hot), clear shoe polish (also applied hot) and various
varnishes, oil-based or not.
I am hesitant about using Shellac, as in the past I found it hard to paint
with acrylics on top of it and I could notl get proper permanent adhesion.
But if I get it to penetrate into the surface, and not be glossy (as
suggested by Liz), it might work!
I have a VERY good varnish in spray that works wonders of all sorts of
surfaces, including plastic covers on my day planner (which I
custom-illustrated and wanted to protect). It is called Weather-All, by
Gare. It boasts it can be used for props to put in an aquarium! My only
worry is that it smells strongly fro more than 2 days (maybe a week would be
enough to evacuate the volatiles). I don't want to drug my customers all the
way to zombie-town!


Before I go and try all the avenues, can people here reccomend some sealing
things that worked for them?
And I meant sealing, not ceiling, although I'm still curious as to how
people manage to walk on their ceiling without special gear...


Any info is as always appreciated, and guaranteed to be spread even further,
as one of my self-apointed art mission is to spread info to all who ask.
Thanks!




Mathieu René Créaturiste
Marionnettes, Masques, Etcetera...
Puppets, Masks, Etcetera...
www.creaturiste.com
creaturiste-AT-magma.ca
(514) 274-8027
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Deborah Hunt" <dhunt-AT-caribe.net>
To: <puptcrit-AT-lists.driftline.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 8:01 AM
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Info about enamels


>
> Mathieu,
> I have been making and performing with masks for the last 30 years. I
> don't
> put anything on the inside of my masks. I live in Puerto Rico where we
> sweat
> constantly and more so under a mask. I wire the edge of the mask and have
> never had one disintergrate or even soften. I also like to see the
> newspares
> I have used. I generally have one piece that has the date. Also I have
> made
> masks in different countries, so the newspaper of that country is always a
> reminder of the experience there. I have found that it is only galleries
> that seem to be concerned about the inside finish.
> Deborah Hunt
> Puerto Rico
>
>
> Not puppetry, but as many masks are used in puppet shows, I thought this
> could still be an on-topic question.
>
>
> I've read the MASKS book by W. T. Benda, a great illustrator and amazing
> maskmaker from the 1930 and 40s.
>
> He said he protected his paper masks by multiple coats of Valspar or
> Shellac
> everywhere on and inside the mask. Then he protected the inside of the
> mask
> with a coat of Mandarin-red enamel.
> As in the rest if his book, he remains very vague about the materials he
> uses. Is the Mandarin-red a special type of enamel, or is it just the
> color?
> I know some people use the red as an interesting color contrast with the
> gold leaf.
> When the enamel is thouroughly dry, he would apply Japan lac, let dry to
> idal tacjyness, then apply gold leaf.
> I will skip the gold leaf, thank you very much. But he used it as a
> durable
> finish, claiming it was devoid of anything that could be harmful to the
> wearer.
>
> So I'm wondering if the enamel, uncovered, once the solvent is fully
> evaporated, could cause breathing or skin troubles overtime?
> What specific sort of enamel should I use?
> Or should I avoid enamels altogether?
> How long does an enamel take to dry?
>
> I've tried white glues of various types, "Future" floor protector (acrylic
> based), and even a waterbased polyurethane (Flecto waterborne, diamond
> finish). None are as strong overtime as I'd wish them to be, hence my idea
> to go back to basics, and use oil-based products for durability.
> I'm weary of using epoxies (glues and coatings), as I have found them to
> be
> prone to cracking.
>
> Do you know of any specific products I could use inside a mask, preferably
> with low solvent or no solvent content?
> How long do they need to dry before they can be worn safely for the
> wearer?
>
> Thanks for any input.
> I had no idea, 5 years ago when I first started, how much trouble it would
> be to find infos (including pictures) on the insides of masks.
> Even professionnal maskmaker websites avoid the subject, or don't know a
> thing about it, or just plain keep it secret.
> Some only talk about "durable acrylic paint". Who ever heard of a really
> durable acrylic paint on the inside of a wearable mask?
> Sweat and friction alone will destroy it in just a little time.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Mathieu René Créaturiste
> Marionnettes, Masques, Etcetera...
> Puppets, Masks, Etcetera...
> www.creaturiste.com
> creaturiste-AT-magma.ca
> (514) 274-8027
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