File puptcrit/puptcrit.0811, message 272


Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 12:18:44 -0500
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] ART OR NOT ART?


I read this article too and it made me want to read "The Gift"
I think Mr Hyde is correct that the marketplace will always be with us.

Primitive humanity realized that nature provided gifts
the sun, fire, water.
These gifts gave us warmth, cooked food,  they give us life
but fire can easily get out of control and rivers and oceans can destroy

We accept the fact that forces of nature can be of great benefit or do great
harm

The gift of human creativity can be of great benefit or do great harm.
We tend to think of creativity as always being good, but the inventor of the
machine gun and the electric chair were creative.

I think it is the same with great wealth.
The wealth of governments, religious institutions, corporations and wealthy
individuals can be of benefit or do harm

Shakespeare had royal patronage. Michaelangelo was employed by the pope.
The royal courts of Asia helped to subsidize and encourage much of the
puppetry that we revere.
The pyramids were built by slave labor and Versailles was built by exploited
French workers.
Without Microsoft and Apple we would not be communicating on puptcrit

I would be in denial if I did not not acknowledge both the benefits and the
harm that great wealth and the marketplace have provided.

On the other hand- Van Gogh never sold a painting. There are hundreds of
artists with no marketplace success that have made our individual and
collective lives more meaningful.


Much of the world culture that makes us what we are, is the result of

On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 9:35 AM, <puppetpro-AT-aol.com> wrote:

> Excellent. I hadn't seen this piece, though I've read Hyde's Trickster
> book. Now I've got to read "The Gift"...
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> an excerpt:
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> In the course of writing "The Gift," Hyde underwent an intellectual
> transformation on this subject. He began the work believing there was "an
> irreconcilable conflict" between gift exchange and the market; the enduring
> (if not necessarily the happy) artist was the one who most successfully
> fended off commercial demands. By the time he was finished, Hyde had come to
> a less-dogmatic conclusion. It was still true, he believed, that the
> marketplace could destroy an artist's gift, but it was equally true that the
> marketplace wasn't going anywhere; it had always existed, and it always
> would. The key was to find a good way to reconcile the two economies.
>
>
>
>
> ----Rolande
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> -Original Message-----
> From: Michael Moynihan <mmoynihan-AT-wi.rr.com>
> To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Sent: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 10:40 pm
> Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] ART OR NOT ART?
>
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> http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/16/magazine/16hyde-t.html?_r=1&th&emc=th&oref=slogin
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