File puptcrit/puptcrit.0811, message 434


Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 19:29:14 -0500
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Ergonomics


Jim Gamble also took the airplane marionette control and re-engineered
it to a diagonal hand position, which is more narural  I use that
control on the one marionette that I use in performance.

On Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 5:18 PM, Alan Cook <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com> wrote:
> Ergonomics in puppetry is highly desirable. Jim Gamble, with a background in engineering, has explored ways to lighten the weight of marionettes,  both to lower shipping costs by air AND to facilitate the operation of the puppets by the puppeteer.
>
> This is a part of puppetry worthy of further exploration. Sadomasochistic operation of puppets is not for most tastes.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Hobey Ford
> Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 1:26 PM
> To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Ergonomics
>
> I agree totally!  I went and saw Dwiggins' Marionettes at the Boston
> Public Library and the thing I came away with was how beautiful and
> ergonomic his controls were.  I have made a point of doing that for
> myself.  When I grab a puppet, the control feels good and is a plesure
> to use.  It is like costumers who make the costumes nice on the inside
> even where they are not seen.  These puppets are our instruments.
>
> On Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 5:59 PM, Mathieu Ren=EF=BF=BD <creaturiste-AT-primusca> wrote:
>> Warning, here's a moderate rant hidden in a topic:
>>
>> Charles mentionned the scale of puppets in relation to the physical
>> capabicites of the performer.
>>
>> I really disagree with the old saying:
>> "if you're comfortable while puppeteering, you're doing something wrong".
>>
>> My belief (and short experience) is that when a puppeteer performs with a
>> well-designed puppet, in a well designed setting, therefore comfortably,
>> he/she has more freedom to concentrate on the performance.
>> I'm not saying every single move will be easy, or that one shouldn't give of
>> himself for the performance.
>>
>> I just mean that the weird twisted masochistic old belief that sacrifice of
>> self (even to the point of physical injury) is noble in and of itself, even
>> when not justified for the show, is pure bull-sh**!
>> This attitude I've seen and heard first hand. I've met two puppeteers,
>> alumni from the same company, who had injured themsvels for life, no longer
>> able to perform large puppets. I hold the puppet company responsible for
>> that, considering how they consistently refuse to change their building
>> methods and materials, with the only argument that they've been doing it for
>> over 25 years.  Oh, and the performers have their own part of responsibility
>> in it, since they decided to keep performing.
>> There is love of the work, but then again, there should be self-respect
>>
>> This doesn't mean that I won't, for a work experience and the love of
>> Puppetry, be caught in the occasional crazy physical contortions. I have,
>> and I will!   I'll just choose my tortures, and refuse those that can't be
>> deemed reasonnable.
>>
>> What do y'all think?
>>
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