File puptcrit/puptcrit.0811, message 51


To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 15:46:39 -0800
Subject: [Puptcrit] Spoon River


Hi Folks.

Hey, It's my first post!

Spoon River Anthology was on Broadway and the original cast album can
still be found. The great Betty Garrett was in the cast.  Uses great old
folk songs mixed with some originals and adaptations.  The problem was
the overwrought singing style of Hal Lynch and to a lesser extent Naomi
Hirshhorn.
A TV version was made with most of the Broadway cast.  

Here is More info from a great site: The Internet Broadway Data Base
IBDB.com  		

Spoon River Anthology

Booth Theatre, (9/29/1963 - 11/16/1963)
Belasco Theatre, (11/18/1963 - 1/4/1964)
Preview:		 	Total Previews:	
Opening:	Sep 29, 1963	 	 	 
Closing:	Jan 4, 1964	 	Total Performances:	111
Category: Musical, Original, Broadway
Setting: A small town in Illinois

Opening Night Production Credits Produced by Joseph Cates; Presented by
Cates Brothers  Originally Produced by The Theatre Group, University
Extension, UCLA    Dramatic reading of the verse of Edgar Lee Masters;
Conceived by Charles Aidman; Music by Naomi Caryl Hirshhorn; Lyrics by
Charles Aidman   Directed by Charles Aidman Lighting Design by Jules
Fisher; 
Opening Night Cast
Charles Aidman 	Reader 	 
Robert Elston 	Reader 	 
Betty Garrett 	Reader 	 
Joyce Van Patten 	Reader 	 
Naomi Caryl Hirshhorn 	Singer 	 
Hal Lynch 	Singer 	 

-----Original Message-----
From: puptcrit-bounces-AT-puptcrit.org
[mailto:puptcrit-bounces-AT-puptcrit.org] On Behalf Of
puptcrit-request-AT-puptcrit.org
Sent: Sunday, November 02, 2008 9:00 AM
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: puptcrit Digest, Vol 49, Issue 2


Send puptcrit mailing list submissions to
	puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
	http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
	puptcrit-request-AT-puptcrit.org

You can reach the person managing the list at
	puptcrit-owner-AT-puptcrit.org

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of puptcrit digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Spoon River Anthology (Freshwater Pearls Puppetry)
   2. Re: you tube Hamlet (Steven Barr)
   3. Re: Hot Glue Gun Warning (Mathieu Ren?)
   4. Hot glue and black light (Mathieu Ren?)
   5. Re: Spoon River/Moon River (Mathieu Ren?)
   6. Inspiring Animation (Mathieu Ren?)
   7. Re: Zipes & Stories (The Independent Eye)
   8. Re: Inspiring Animation (Mary Horsley)
   9. A marionete is a marionette is a marionette (Alan Cook)
  10. Re: Spoon River Anthology (The Independent Eye)
  11. terms for puppet types (Alan Cook)
  12. Re: actors/puppeteers (Hobey Ford)
  13. terms for puppet types (Alan Cook)
  14. Re: terms for puppet types (Alan Cook)
  15. Re: A marionete is a marionette is a marionette (Fred Greenspan)
  16. Re: terms for puppet types (Fred Greenspan)
  17. Spoon River Anthology w/ shadows (Alan Cook)
  18. Sicilian puppet weght (Alan Cook)
  19. Re: Spoon River Puppets (Carolyn Roark)
  20. Re: Spoon River Puppets (Alan Cook)
  21. Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS (Mathieu Ren?)
  22. Peter Brosius, Children's Theatre (Alan Cook)
  23. Re: actors/puppeteers (Christopher Hudert)
  24. Re: A marionete is a marionette is a marionette
      (Christopher Hudert)
  25. Re: A marionete is a marionette is a marionette (Alan Cook)
  26. Re: Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS (Puppet People)
  27. Re: Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS (Mathieu Ren?)
  28. Mask for voice changing/training (Mathieu Ren?)
  29. Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes (STEVE AXTELL)
  30. review: All Hail You Mighty Lords of Nowhere! (Mathieu Ren?)
  31. Re: Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes (Mathieu Ren?)
  32. Re: Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes (STEVE AXTELL)
  33. Zipes titles (Chris Griffith)
  34. Re: Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes (Brett Roberts)
  35. Re: Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes (STEVE AXTELL)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 11:02:59 -0500
From: Freshwater Pearls Puppetry <puppetry-AT-freshwpearls.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Anthology
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <20081101110259979180.6efe0c88-AT-freshwpearls.com>

For several years I've had a shadow version of "Spoon River" inventing
itself in the recesses of my brain. Maybe someday I'll bring it into the
physical world! The book's vignette structure would really lend itself
to puppetry, I think. It's quite the soap opera, exploring just about
every frailty of human nature. Definitely not subject matter for the
kiddies, but a fine adult show. BTW, folksinger Michael Smith wrote a
lovely little piece about Spoon River:
http://www.artistsofnote.com/michael/lyrics/spoon-river.shtml, and
Claudia Schmidt recorded it:
http://www.last.fm/music/Claudia+Schmidt/_/Spoon+River?autostart .
Wouldn't that make a great soundtrack?

Regards,
Diane

http://www.freshwaterpearlspuppetry.com/bubbleblog/

"You must remember this: a fish ain't just a fish. A fish is no dumb
guy! For, every fishie goes to school: they're smart small fry."


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 10:24:28 -0700
From: "Steven Barr" <lapuppet-AT-gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] you tube Hamlet
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID:
	<a34a1e9a0811011024hca67ad4v3672e1c3b18c974-AT-mail.gmail.com>

I think one can name our instruments anything we like.
Sisslian puppets, why not, but what do they call the style in Sicily?
Czech puppets, how do they call them in Prague. Standardized names are
for the PR people and mass market, but I name those "Ghost" puppets of
mine-- "Sergin2". Some of you have seen them. They have a "motor" rod--
one that holds the weight of the puppet-- but instead of it being in the
head, it is in the back or top of the collarbone. That frees the head to
have 2 strings to allow a much more ethereal head movement-- which
Eugene prefers-- yet retain the quick body locomotion with no
wiggles-- that I like. My years with my hands inside the hand or glove
puppets have tilted me towards a preference to fast movement. cheers,
Steven R-B


On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 7:30 AM, Hobey Ford <hobeyone-AT-gmail.com> wrote:

> Sissilian marionettes?
>
> On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Steven Barr <lapuppet-AT-gmail.com> 
> wrote:
> > These Rod in Head are the original marionettes- String Puppets. They
> later
> > put stings on the heads to get more subtle  head movements but it 
> > slowed
> the
> > overall walk--- and projected puppetry into the modern marionnette 
> > that
> is
> > very limited in its movements. The Rod in the head allows an 
> > immediate
> > movement-- and it is very cool. More primative but cool. The French
call
> it
> > a marionnette a tringle  as opposed to marionnette a fils (string
> puppet). I
> > don't know if it should be named here in America so it doesn't 
> > become a "type". Because it belongs to that Hybrid Family of Puppets

> > which defy labels and lean on invention and proto-type. I love this 
> > style of Puppet. Check out the film trailer at: 
> > www.classicsinminiature.com and see them used in a stylized film. 
> > cool, steven Ritz- Barr
> >
> > On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 11:27 AM, Mathieu Ren? 
> ><creaturiste-AT-primus.ca
> >wrote:
> >
> >> Very cool puppets, who made them?
> >>
> >> Cool movements! Who performed them?
> >>
> >> I love the wide movements of dances and chases!
> >> Makes me want to build this type of puppet.
> >> What's the official name of the rod-in-head with strings? For now, 
> >> I
> heard
> >> a
> >> lot of people call them czech puppets, but it's probably a vague 
> >> designation. Czechs must build all sorts of puppets!
> >>
> >> The performing possibilities and the sturdyness are very appealing 
> >> to
> me.
> >>
> >> Cool shots.
> >> Were they filmed at the indoor carroussel on Water street in 
> >> Brooklyn, almost under the bridge? I happened to walk there while 
> >> on my trip last week-end. Cool place!
> >>
> >> I think I exceeded my daily usage quota of the word "cool". But I'm

> >> cool with that.
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> >> Admin interface: 
> >> http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> >> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
> > "This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of
> puppetry
> > to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best."
> > -Dr. Kathie Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and 
> > Professor
> >
> > Classics in Miniature, LLC
> > Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
> > www.lapuppet.com
> > www.classicsinminiature.com 
> > _______________________________________________
> > List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> > Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> > Archives: http://www.driftline.org
> >
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>



-- 
FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
"This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of
puppetry to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best." -Dr. Kathie
Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and Professor

Classics in Miniature, LLC
Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
www.lapuppet.com
www.classicsinminiature.com


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 15:17:45 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Hot Glue Gun Warning
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <E37E3E9FA7264C5B8DD5ABF505C5D445-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

Hi hobey.

The glue gun died because of my negligence, and especially my approach
to 
try to fix it (poking a sharp object inside).

I'm still a fan of this glue gun model, and I will get another one. But
for now, I'm all set, I had forgotten that recently, I ressuscitated an 
old glue gun of mine.
While getting rid of stuff, I realized the removable cord from my old 
camera's battery charger was the same as the glue gun's, which had
broken 
years ago. I had kept the gun, which was fine, in case I ever got into 
electrical experiments.

So I have a decent glue gun that works well, until I can find my dream
model 
again.
It's just not a staple around here. The three brands I see the most are 
Arrow(pretty good), Surebonder(the model I tried was crap), and
Mastercraft 
(ok).




------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 15:22:55 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Hot glue and black light
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <5632665982A845D2B8C7EC7925D362EE-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

Last night, at a Halloween party, I noticed some odd blueish-white glow
on 
the edge of my skull mask.
I touched it, and realized it was an accidental spot of hot glue. I
exposed 
the insides of the mask, where more hot glue would show, and wow, it
sure 
looks neat!

Hot glue shows translucent ghostly white under black light!

My guess is that someone could design a pretty groovy texture, or an
actual 
puppet made of hot glue, and use black light to give it a very special 
presence...

No leaving that puppet under spotlights, or put in a window display, at 
anytime!

I'd try it right now, but among amny things, I have pics to go out to
take 
pics of my Halloween costume, so I can show you!






------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 15:25:30 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River/Moon River
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <0291874E4B934ECDBB0A26267DF700B0-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

"Spoon River" sounds fantastic to me as a title, bringing visuals of
that 
most wonderful eating ustencil floating atop a delicious river of multi 
flavors!


"Spoon River,
out to eat the world,
 there's such a lot of world,
 to scoop...."




------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 15:42:38 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Inspiring Animation
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <1BB9DCD315B64743BE65E4E198E21BD0-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/133545/detail/

The cutest destroyer of civilisation I've ever seen.
Surprising use of technical drawing as a visual style.
Good story.

Stumbled upon it when clicking on the link Suzanne provided for Dawkin's

writing a children's book. Thanks Suzanne! 



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 12:33:17 -0700
From: The Independent Eye <eye-AT-independenteye.org>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Zipes & Stories
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <p06240803c5325f481795-AT-[192.0.0.100]>

>Is Peter Brosius still in MN?
>Does anyone know how I can contact him?
>I haven't seen him in 15 yrs.

Yes, he's director of the Children's Theatre Company.  I'd imagine 
you could get him thru the CTC website or office.

Cheers-
Conrad B.


------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 15:39:26 -0400
From: Mary  Horsley <mphorsley-AT-earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Inspiring Animation
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <C53228AE.AB87%mphorsley-AT-earthlink.net>

Very interesting.....could be the starter for a very in-depth
conversation!

Mary H. 


On 11/1/08 3:42 PM, "Mathieu Ren?" <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca> wrote:

> http://www.milkandcookies.com/link/133545/detail/
> 
> The cutest destroyer of civilisation I've ever seen. Surprising use of

> technical drawing as a visual style. Good story.
> 
> Stumbled upon it when clicking on the link Suzanne provided for 
> Dawkin's writing a children's book. Thanks Suzanne!
> 
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org




------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:57:01 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] A marionete is a marionette is a marionette
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV12BD452566F60F13128027BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

As long as the puppet is SUSPENDED, I think "marionette" will do just
fine as a name for the type of puppet, as it already has for a rather
long time.

And for Macy Balloons (and their derivatives) "upside down marionette"
works for me. Bob Bromley's famous trapeze clown marionette was operated
from below, by means of pullies which were above the actual puppet. All
of Bob's other marionttes were operated in the cnventional mode.

Sometimes we worry  too much about unimportant things, at a time when
there is plenty to really worry about.

ALAN COOK.


-----Original Message-----
From: Steven Barr
Sent: Saturday, November 1, 2008 10:24 AM
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] you tube Hamlet

I think one can name our instruments anything we like.
Sisslian puppets, why not, but what do they call the style in Sicily?
Czech puppets, how do they call them in Prague. Standardized names are
for the PR people and mass market, but I name those "Ghost" puppets of
mine-- "Sergin2". Some of you have seen them. They have a "motor" rod--
one that holds the weight of the puppet-- but instead of it being in the
head, it is in the back or top of the collarbone. That frees the head to
have 2 strings to allow a much more ethereal head movement-- which
Eugene prefers-- yet retain the quick body locomotion with no
wiggles-- that I like. My years with my hands inside the hand or glove
puppets have tilted me towards a preference to fast movement. cheers,
Steven R-B


On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 7:30 AM, Hobey Ford <hobeyone-AT-gmail.com> wrote:

> Sissilian marionettes?
>
> On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Steven Barr <lapuppet-AT-gmail.com> 
> wrote:
> > These Rod in Head are the original marionettes- String Puppets. They
> later
> > put stings on the heads to get more subtle  head movements but it 
> > slowed
> the
> > overall walk--- and projected puppetry into the modern marionnette 
> > that
> is
> > very limited in its movements. The Rod in the head allows an 
> > immediate
> > movement-- and it is very cool. More primative but cool. The French
call
> it
> > a marionnette a tringle  as opposed to marionnette a fils (string
> puppet). I
> > don't know if it should be named here in America so it doesn't 
> > become a "type". Because it belongs to that Hybrid Family of Puppets

> > which defy labels and lean on invention and proto-type. I love this 
> > style of Puppet. Check out the film trailer at: 
> > www.classicsinminiature.com and see them used in a stylized film. 
> > cool, steven Ritz- Barr
> >
> > On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 11:27 AM, Mathieu Ren??? 
> ><creaturiste-AT-primus.ca
> >wrote:
> >
> >> Very cool puppets, who made them?
> >>
> >> Cool movements! Who performed them?
> >>
> >> I love the wide movements of dances and chases!
> >> Makes me want to build this type of puppet.
> >> What's the official name of the rod-in-head with strings? For now, 
> >> I
> heard
> >> a
> >> lot of people call them czech puppets, but it's probably a vague 
> >> designation. Czechs must build all sorts of puppets!
> >>
> >> The performing possibilities and the sturdyness are very appealing 
> >> to
> me.
> >>
> >> Cool shots.
> >> Were they filmed at the indoor carroussel on Water street in 
> >> Brooklyn, almost under the bridge? I happened to walk there while 
> >> on my trip last week-end. Cool place!
> >>
> >> I think I exceeded my daily usage quota of the word "cool". But I'm

> >> cool with that.
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> >> Admin interface: 
> >> http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> >> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
> > "This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of
> puppetry
> > to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best."
> > -Dr. Kathie Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and 
> > Professor
> >
> > Classics in Miniature, LLC
> > Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
> > www.lapuppet.com
> > www.classicsinminiature.com 
> > _______________________________________________
> > List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> > Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> > Archives: http://www.driftline.org
> >
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>



-- 
FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
"This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of
puppetry to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best." -Dr. Kathie
Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and Professor

Classics in Miniature, LLC
Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
www.lapuppet.com
www.classicsinminiature.com
_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org





------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 13:00:55 -0700
From: The Independent Eye <eye-AT-independenteye.org>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Anthology
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <p06240804c53260b16c35-AT-[192.0.0.100]>

>For several years I've had a shadow version of "Spoon River"
>inventing itself in the recesses of my brain. Maybe someday I'll 
>bring it into the physical world! The book's vignette structure 
>would really lend itself to puppetry, I think. It's quite the soap 
>opera, exploring just about every frailty of human nature. 
>Definitely not subject matter for the kiddies, but a fine adult 
>show. BTW, folksinger Michael Smith wrote a lovely little piece 
>about Spoon River: 
>http://www.artistsofnote.com/michael/lyrics/spoon-river.shtml, and 
>Claudia Schmidt recorded it: 
>http://www.last.fm/music/Claudia+Schmidt/_/Spoon+River?autostart . 
>Wouldn't that make a great soundtrack?

I think it would make a gorgeous piece.  It's been done quite a lot 
in the theatre with live actors, as it played Off-Broadway many years 
ago.  It's possible that would complicate the rights - you'd probably 
have to do as others do, simply pay for the dramatic rights and then 
use whatever poems you wanted in whatever arrangement.  (Masters died 
in 1950 so I don't think it's public domain.)  The original producers 
added a couple of very goopy (to my taste, anyhow) pseudo-folk songs 
- instrumental music would work much better.  The Michael Smith 
lyrics you quote are much closer to the heart of the book than the 
syrupy nostalgia some producers infuse it with.

Challenge with shadows would be to find what imagery serves as a 
visual field for the poems.  In the theatre it's generally just the 
actor doing a monolog to the audience, and that carries it, whereas 
just a talking shadow would wear thin fast.  But many possibilities 
of interfacing images from the poems with some anchoring figure. 
Might consider using as a light source (or one of several) 
rear-projected images of the speakers (from period photographs). 
Everything depends of course on the vocal line.  Might work to have a 
single reader with just indications of the in-character voices, 
rather than multiple actors - there's something about the strength of 
the highly-concentrated focus of a shadow piece that wants, in the 
vocal line, a very strong sense of its coming from a single 
consciousness.  If you used multiple voices, then something else - 
maybe the music score - might serve that tying-together function.

Anyway, now that you've made this public announcement of your secret 
desires, you're probably going to have to do it.  As to audience, I 
don't know if there's a jr. high or high school audience anywhere for 
puppetry, but it'd definitely work for that age group.  The writing 
is tough, real, and very accessible, and maybe has some marketability 
as an American-historical piece.

Peace & joy-
Conrad B.


------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:00:43 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] terms for puppet types
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV12800D56F24B54B0CE8FBEBC230-AT-phx.gbl>

In Sicily, the term is "Pupi"  as in Opra di Pupi. You can call them
"maronettes" since so many don't speak Italian.

ALAN




------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 16:02:46 -0400
From: "Hobey Ford" <hobeyone-AT-gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] actors/puppeteers
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID:
	<94bd5b080811011302w6d6a519cu27711c518fdbe5ed-AT-mail.gmail.com>

Yeah, a lot of actors will upstage their puppets and refuse to step
behind the character.

On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 11:23 AM, Alan Cook <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
wrote:
> More than once I have seen actors totally incapable as puppeteers. The

> problem was EGO.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>


------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:19:53 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] terms for puppet types
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV459026022C020B793F661BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

A major reason for the metal rods to Pupi heads is the WEIGHT FACTOR.
Sicilian puppets tend to be among the heaviest. 

The rod to the right hand (or sword hand) avoids a penulum effect, is
more direct---it just makes sense.

As for the small Czech marionettes with a wire to the head, weiht is not
such a factor. But the market for little string puppets was for home
theaters, and with the wire, the strings are less apt to tangle.

After retiring the Turnabout Theater, which used only strings on his
marionetes, Harry Burnett made a "tangleproof" series of marionettes to
sell, which used a sturdy  wire to the head..

ALAN




------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:22:36 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] terms for puppet types
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV97140ED220DD0F3251C68BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

The PENDULUM effect is avoided by using a metal rod for the right
(sword) hand of a Sicilian Knight. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Alan Cook
Sent: Saturday, November 1, 2008 1:19 PM
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: [Puptcrit] terms for puppet types

A major reason for the metal rods to Pupi heads is the WEIGHT FACTOR.
Sicilian puppets tend to be among the heaviest. 

The rod to the right hand (or sword hand) avoids a penulum effect, is
more direct---it just makes sense.

As for the small Czech marionettes with a wire to the head, weiht is not
such a factor. But the market for little string puppets was for home
theaters, and with the wire, the strings are less apt to tangle.

After retiring the Turnabout Theater, which used only strings on his
marionetes, Harry Burnett made a "tangleproof" series of marionettes to
sell, which used a sturdy  wire to the head..

ALAN


_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org





------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 16:23:04 -0400
From: Fred Greenspan <greenspan-AT-earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] A marionete is a marionette is a marionette
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <244501C0-77B8-4C12-A24F-B42619CDCE97-AT-earthlink.net>
format=flowed

I've taken to calling them "rod-marionettes," in order to distinguish  
them from the better known all string version, when offering a  
detailed description of my compact table top show that utilizes them.  
In shorter descriptions I just call them "Italian marionettes." I  
enjoy performing with them because they move with the sponteneity of  
hand puppets.

Fred Greenspan - Traditional Puppeteer
Ossining, New York
http://www.traditionalpuppetry.com
Punch & Judy, Italian marionettes, flea circus

On Nov 1, 2008, at 7:57 PM, Alan Cook wrote:

> As long as the puppet is SUSPENDED, I think "marionette" will do
> just fine as a name for the type of puppet, as it already has for a  
> rather long time.
>
> And for Macy Balloons (and their derivatives) "upside down
> marionette" works for me. Bob Bromley's famous trapeze clown  
> marionette was operated from below, by means of pullies which were  
> above the actual puppet. All of Bob's other marionttes were  
> operated in the cnventional mode.
>
> Sometimes we worry  too much about unimportant things, at a time
> when there is plenty to really worry about.
>
> ALAN COOK.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Steven Barr
> Sent: Saturday, November 1, 2008 10:24 AM
> To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] you tube Hamlet
>
> I think one can name our instruments anything we like. Sisslian 
> puppets, why not, but what do they call the style in Sicily? Czech 
> puppets, how do they call them in Prague. Standardized names are for 
> the PR people and mass market, but I
> name those
> "Ghost" puppets of mine-- "Sergin2". Some of you have seen them.  
> They have a
> "motor" rod-- one that holds the weight of the puppet-- but instead  
> of it
> being in the head, it is in the back or top of the collarbone. That  
> frees
> the head to have 2 strings to allow a much more ethereal head  
> movement--
> which Eugene prefers-- yet retain the quick body locomotion with no
> wiggles-- that I like. My years with my hands inside the hand or glove
> puppets have tilted me towards a preference to fast movement.
> cheers,
> Steven R-B
>
>
> On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 7:30 AM, Hobey Ford <hobeyone-AT-gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Sissilian marionettes?
>>
>> On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Steven Barr <lapuppet-AT-gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>> These Rod in Head are the original marionettes- String Puppets. They
>> later
>>> put stings on the heads to get more subtle  head movements but it
>>> slowed
>> the
>>> overall walk--- and projected puppetry into the modern
>>> marionnette that
>> is
>>> very limited in its movements. The Rod in the head allows an
>>> immediate
>>> movement-- and it is very cool. More primative but cool. The  
>>> French call
>> it
>>> a marionnette a tringle  as opposed to marionnette a fils (string
>> puppet). I
>>> don't know if it should be named here in America so it doesn't
>>> become a
>>> "type". Because it belongs to that Hybrid Family of Puppets which  
>>> defy
>>> labels and lean on invention and proto-type. I love this style of  
>>> Puppet.
>>> Check out the film trailer at: www.classicsinminiature.com
>>> and see them used in a stylized film.
>>> cool,
>>> steven Ritz- Barr
>>>
>>> On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 11:27 AM, Mathieu Ren???
>>> <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Very cool puppets, who made them?
>>>>
>>>> Cool movements! Who performed them?
>>>>
>>>> I love the wide movements of dances and chases!
>>>> Makes me want to build this type of puppet.
>>>> What's the official name of the rod-in-head with strings? For
>>>> now, I
>> heard
>>>> a
>>>> lot of people call them czech puppets, but it's probably a vague 
>>>> designation. Czechs must build all sorts of puppets!
>>>>
>>>> The performing possibilities and the sturdyness are very
>>>> appealing to
>> me.
>>>>
>>>> Cool shots.
>>>> Were they filmed at the indoor carroussel on Water street in
>>>> Brooklyn,
>>>> almost under the bridge?
>>>> I happened to walk there while on my trip last week-end. Cool  
>>>> place!
>>>>
>>>> I think I exceeded my daily usage quota of the word "cool". But I'm

>>>> cool with that.
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
>>>> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/
>>>> puptcrit
>>>> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
>>> "This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of
>> puppetry
>>> to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best."
>>> -Dr. Kathie Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and
>>> Professor
>>>
>>> Classics in Miniature, LLC
>>> Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
>>> www.lapuppet.com
>>> www.classicsinminiature.com 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
>>> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
>>> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
>> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
>> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>>
>
>
>
> --
> FAUST PuppenFilm by Steven Ritz-Barr
> "This is a fascinating piece which uses the visual-music aspect of  
> puppetry
> to make images as puppet theatre can at it's best."
> -Dr. Kathie Folie, Univ. of Cal, Santa Cruz Theatre Chair and  
> Professor
>
> Classics in Miniature, LLC
> Metropolitan Puppet Authority, Non-profit
> www.lapuppet.com
> www.classicsinminiature.com 
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org



------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 16:32:08 -0400
From: Fred Greenspan <greenspan-AT-earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] terms for puppet types
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <2421B3E5-BBEF-4F4C-B721-B3B092D424D1-AT-earthlink.net>
format=flowed

My understanding, from my recollection of my readings of the history  
of Victorian Marionettes, is that originally rod-marionettes were  
commonly used for dramas, while the all string ones were just used  
for specialty trick puppets. By the late 19th Century (1880's) the  
traveling troupes in England and the U.S. began performing dramas  
with the all string type. The rod-marionettes continued in traditions  
in Belgium and Flanders as well as in Sicily and the Czech region. I  
believe only one of the Sicilian family traditions were large and  
heavy, the other regional traditions were somewhat smaller and lighter.

Fred Greenspan - Traditional Puppeteer
Ossining, New York
http://www.traditionalpuppetry.com
Punch & Judy, Italian marionettes, flea circus

On Nov 1, 2008, at 8:19 PM, Alan Cook wrote:

> A major reason for the metal rods to Pupi heads is the WEIGHT
> FACTOR. Sicilian puppets tend to be among the heaviest.
>
> The rod to the right hand (or sword hand) avoids a penulum effect,
> is more direct---it just makes sense.
>
> As for the small Czech marionettes with a wire to the head, weiht
> is not such a factor. But the market for little string puppets was  
> for home theaters, and with the wire, the strings are less apt to  
> tangle.
>
> After retiring the Turnabout Theater, which used only strings on
> his marionetes, Harry Burnett made a "tangleproof" series of  
> marionettes to sell, which used a sturdy  wire to the head..
>
> ALAN
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org



------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:33:18 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Anthology w/ shadows
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV3D448FEB43CAB4D9466EFBC230-AT-phx.gbl>

Regarding doing Spoon River Anthology with shadow puppets:

I think multiple light sources would be helpful in avoiding mere
"talking shadow heads". and adapting the lighting techniques used so
brilliantly by Larry Reed in his recent shadow productions could be
interesting. Adding various patterns of lace and tree branches,
rooflines of towns or farms---as many visual varieties as one could
muster, small and large versions of a character---just about any legit
use of imagery through shadows, and add color.




------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:45:14 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Sicilian puppet weght
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV47A09CCCE664203A931BCBC230-AT-phx.gbl>

In Catania, the Southern Sicilian puppets could reach 4 to 5 ft tall and
would be very heavy. The smaller Sicilian pupi (roughly 2 to 3 ft tall)
of Palermo are still notably heavier than similar sized marionettes,
with wood heads, torsoes, legs, feet, plus metal armor if they are
knights.

I often hand a Palermo puppet to visitors, and they immediately react
wih surprise at the weight.

There are souvenir versions of Palermo knights with thinner metal used
in the armor (it dents easily)---these are NOT professional performing
figures, but make nice decorations. Unscrupulous sellers frequently pass
these off as "antique" and may go so far as painting "patina" or  fake
corrosion on the armor. (one of the dangers of e-bay).

ALAN




------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 14:02:01 -0700 (PDT)
From: Carolyn Roark <roarkcd-AT-yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Puppets
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <284879.31719.qm-AT-web33902.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Actually, I HAVE done a production using the Spoon River Anthology as a
starting points. A group of my undergraduate students and I built table
top figures, and these were manipulated while one of the students
recited one of the poems as a monologue. The opening poem they performed
in concert, using their hands to make a face (an idea that we stole from
the film "Labyrinth").

The piece was created for a Day of the Dead celebration (so, three years
ago tomorrow!).

Carolyn

 "Courage in Women is often mistaken for insanity."



      

------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 21:15:45 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Puppets
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV58ACD730F4184E542DD19BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

Hi Carolyn-

Wish I could have seen your tabletop scene from Spoon River Anthology.
Can you give us any details? Was this a class exercise or did you have
to get rights to use the material? What about the technical end,
puppetwise (including size, design, etc of puppet elements). Any photos?

ALAN


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Roark
Sent: Saturday, November 1, 2008 2:02 PM
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Spoon River Puppets

Actually, I HAVE done a production using the Spoon River Anthology as a
starting points. A group of my undergraduate students and I built table
top figures, and these were manipulated while one of the students
recited one of the poems as a monologue. The opening poem they performed
in concert, using their hands to make a face (an idea that we stole from
the film "Labyrinth").

The piece was created for a Day of the Dead celebration (so, three years
ago tomorrow!).

Carolyn

 "Courage in Women is often mistaken for insanity."



      
_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org





------------------------------

Message: 21
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 17:36:49 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <6A5116B1071840D5A3FF4B26C790C76C-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

Hi all. Here are the pics of my Halloween costume for this year.
Comments and questions are very welcome!

http://creaturistelab.blogspot.com/2008/11/skullmask-finished.html


------------------------------

Message: 22
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 21:37:32 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Peter Brosius, Children's Theatre
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV723E0B405B5E802AE9F49BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

September 4th the Children's Theatre premiered their production of the
Peter Pan story, using shadow puppets by Italian puppeteer Fabrizzio
Montecchi (of Piacenza in Northern Italy).  Rohan Preston (612) 673-4390
reported on the new production in the Minneapolis Star-Telegram for Sept
4th, 2008, which I found on-line searching under "Peter Brosius".

The show has a Fall run, and returns for the Christmas holiday season in
December, then plans a tour to England in 2009.

The show is directed by Douglas Irvine (Scotland). Definitely an
inernational production!

Any reports available from puptcritters in the Twin Cities?

ALAN




------------------------------

Message: 23
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 18:14:40 -0400
From: Christopher Hudert <heyhoot-AT-mindspring.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] actors/puppeteers
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <411f3c12fb86e971a0fdac7a74c36b6a-AT-mindspring.com>

On Nov 1, 2008, at 4:02 PM, Hobey Ford wrote:

> On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 11:23 AM, Alan Cook <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
> wrote:
>> More than once I have seen actors totally incapable as puppeteers.
>> The problem was EGO.
> Yeah, a lot of actors will upstage their puppets and refuse to step
> behind the character.

Perhaps Ego is the problem, in some cases, but I've seen puppeteers do 
the same. Sometimes it is simply not knowing the basic rule of three 
for performing: take the stage, give the stage, and share the stage. Or 
not knowing how to tell the difference between which to use when. Or 
not having enough confidence in the story and/or their abilities to 
allow the puppet to be the focus of attention. Or just trying to 
compensate for any number of shortcomings - personally or 
professionally. In short, ironically it may be lack of ego that is 
screaming for attention.

On Nov 1, 2008, at 10:50 AM, Hobey Ford wrote:

> On talking with the director it was the first time I ever heard the
> notion of casting actors instead of puppeteers.  He felt like he could

> train an actor to be a  puppeteer easier than training a puppeteer to 
> be an actor.  That is sort of an indictment of puppeteers, but I have 
> heard the sentiment many times since..  I think it just says that a 
> trained actor brings so much to the table that a "puppeteer' might not

> bring.  We are muliti taskers and generalists. "puppeteer" is a title 
> that can mean so many things.  It gets back to all the fuss about  the

> "master puppeteer" title.  I think that that director must not have 
> had  access to a pool of real talented puppeteers.  I know too that 
> many actors come short on learning what it takkes to be a skilled 
> nuianced puppet performer.
>
> On Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 10:33 AM,  <BNathanson-AT-aol.com> wrote:
>> Hobey,
>>   The Griffin and the minor Canon - ... that was one of the most 
>> perfect puppet shows we have seen, even up until today.   I have 
>> always felt that no matter how exquisite the puppets are built and
>> costumed, the story is what holds and keep an audience. The range of 
>> emotions that the audience felt for the Griffin was stunning.  ...
>> Bob Nathanson

Why is it a surprise that a director would chose an actor over a 
puppeteer for a film or play that involved puppets? Even, sometimes, if 
that show is a puppet show?

I think this more goes to the wants/needs of the director or 
production, and to a certain extent to their understanding of the arts 
and limitations puppetry, than it is an indictment of puppeteers. From 
a directors or producers viewpoint they are looking for the drama and 
want someone who can act. Not all puppeteers can, particularly if they 
work to a tape (be it dialogue or all music) as they can be unpracticed 
in vocal acting. The puppeteer is playing an instrument (the puppet) 
and like someone who plays the guitar or other instrument, may or may 
not also be able to act or sing or dance. I would think that a director 
is correct in that the majority of their needs are served by hiring an 
actor over a puppeteer. From their viewpoint, the story and acting it 
out is of higher priority than playing the instrument well. I would 
guess that they figured that they could teach them to work a puppet 
passably well, more easily they could teach a puppeteer to act not just 
passably well but to the level that the story required (in their mind's 
eye.) Any person who plays the instrument seen being used in a film or 
play, or has a decent knowledge of how it is done, be it puppet or 
piano, can pick out right away that the actor isn't playing it 
correctly, if at all. But if the story carries the action and emotion, 
it may not matter much.

   In some workshops I teach, I use David Sympich (sp) as an example. 
Some would argue that because in some (all?) of his shows he moves the 
puppets very little, almost not at all, leaving them in frozen 
animation, therefore he is not really a puppeteer - or not a good one. 
If measuring by lifelike movement alone as the standard of good 
puppetry, it is a viable assessment. But I would counter that THAT 
measurement alone is not enough. Add to it David's superb voice talent, 
outstanding storytelling talent, and incomparable figures that he 
builds, and I would say he is one of this nation's finest puppeteers. 
The other aspects make me want him NOT to move the puppets much. I want 
to get lost in the figures, the story, and the character voices he is 
creating. I can do that better being drawn in, to an almost motionless 
figure, more readily than to one that was "acting" in motion. IMO it is 
his economy of movement, and his trust in his combined abilities 
including that economy, that make his shows what they are: a real 
treasure to experience.

  However, there are many talented puppeteers who are also excellent 
actors. so directors are shortchanging themselves if they don't explore 
those options.

When casting a puppet show with non-puppeteers, things that would put 
you higher on my list of potential puppeteers is if you can dance and 
sing or play a musical instrument, then if you have acting experience 
or can do a cold reading. It is as important to me that you understand 
(with you body as well as your mind) movement and rhythm as is your 
acting ability. I think I can more quickly train someone to work a 
puppet and then perform through that puppet if they understand those 
elements than I can someone who is "just a serious actor."  But to 
teach a puppeteer who is not also an actor to act, and to act well? 
Given any sort of rehearsal time constraints, training a puppeteer up 
to acting speed would take longer than an actor (who can already dance 
and sing) up to puppeteer speed. But then if you've seen my shows you 
will know that they are not about the realistic manipulation. Yes, the 
manipulation is a good part of it, but without the story there is no 
point to my show. This could change with the addition of shows that are 
less story driven, but at this point the story is in the driver's seat 
and that's what I prefer. You mileage may differ.

Christopher



------------------------------

Message: 24
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 18:26:14 -0400
From: Christopher Hudert <heyhoot-AT-mindspring.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] A marionete is a marionette is a marionette
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <381dd3e4cba79aedcfe737e295a587cb-AT-mindspring.com>

    I, too, refer to those with rods as rod marionettes, rather than 
Italian or Sicilian, as the style is used in other area as well 
(France, Czech, etc). Certainly the Sicilian are the best know of this 
form. I do use all string (no rod) marionettes as well, but the rod 
form works better for some things and shows, especially when I need to 
operate two puppets at once. I've learned to string the puppet in such 
a way that I can work the hand strings, rocker bar for the legs, and 
holding the puppet, all with one hand. Doesn't work for everything, or 
as well as two handed manipulation, but it increases the expressiveness 
of the puppet when the hands don't just hang limp when I'm working two 
at once.

Christopher

On Nov 1, 2008, at 4:23 PM, Fred Greenspan wrote:

> I've taken to calling them "rod-marionettes," in order to distinguish
> them from the better known all string version, when offering a
> detailed description of my compact table top show that utilizes them. 
> In shorter descriptions I just call them "Italian marionettes." I
> enjoy performing with them because they move with the sponteneity of 
> hand puppets.
>



------------------------------

Message: 25
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 22:37:07 GMT
From: "Alan Cook" <alangregorycook-AT-msn.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] A marionete is a marionette is a marionette
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <BLU111-DAV5603AA7D23F4596F7B494BC230-AT-phx.gbl>

It has been reported in print that mariionettes with a wire or metal rod
to the head followed a trade route, going from Sicily  through Belgium,
& France. So I guess the Czechs could get in on it too..




------------------------------

Message: 26
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 22:54:15 -0400
From: "Puppet People" <puppetpeople-AT-nycap.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <000e01c93c96$4b2f45c0$38cdf243-AT-YOUR4353FC193C>
	reply-type=original

hey mathieu;
    again great job, was tthe mask made out of Paper Mache? Hope you had
a 
great halloween.

Mark
The puppet people
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mathieu Ren?" <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2008 5:36 PM
Subject: [Puptcrit] Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS


> Hi all. Here are the pics of my Halloween costume for this year.
> Comments and questions are very welcome!
>
> http://creaturistelab.blogspot.com/2008/11/skullmask-finished.html
> _______________________________________________
> List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
> Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
> Archives: http://www.driftline.org 



------------------------------

Message: 27
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 23:50:24 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Giant Skull Mask finished: PICS
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <8643189A12BF4977B12A19A0ED63ED22-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

Hey hey Mark.
Thanks!

Yeah, it was made using the technique I call Paper Mache Bark, which is 
described in detail in mul;tiple posts on my blog:
http://creaturistelab.blogspot.com/2008/06/faster-paper-mache-shell.html
http://creaturistelab.blogspot.com/2008/09/giant-skull-mask-wip.html
http://creaturistelab.blogspot.com/2008/10/giant-skull-mask-2.html

The expressive possibilities of it are yet mostly unexplored. They feel
like 
impasto on paintings should feel, but often doesn't (to me), because the

effect with the paint is not as slef standing or as bold as I'd like.
with the paper however, I get peaks higher than I'll probably ever need.

When total smoothness is not wanted or required, and when texture is an 
essential, this method allows me to make a strong paper mache shell very

quickly, in one application, cutting down the time by at least half, 
depending on the complexity of shapes to cover.

I've thrown that mask on the floor about 5 times since yesterday, and
the 
effect (not a bump, not a crack, not a scratch, was convincing to those 
present who asked about the strenght of such a thing.






------------------------------

Message: 28
Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 00:10:08 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Mask for voice changing/training
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <1E68924A6ABE4AC1B68F6B7F3C19A63F-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

I was driving my bicycle home from a puppet performance just a few
minutes 
ago, and an idea came back into my mind.

I was in full Grim Reaper Costumer, and my giant skull head was
protecting 
me from the cold wind, and I was singing. the sound in there is pretty 
interesting, and this reminded me of a few yars ago, when I came upon
with 
an acient concept which I still need to try:

Making masks that amplify and/or modify the actors's voice.
Just like ancient Greek masks are believed to have done (has this been
truly 
confirmed?).

I'd like to make a mask with a trumpet shape for the mouth, maybe one
with 
other shapes for different sounds. Such masks could benefit from today's

technology, such as a wireless microphone well placed to capture the
right 
sound, and make it heard by all around, via a speaker.

Such a mask could also be designed for singers or actors, so that they
can 
rehearse their singing without any electrical needs, and without
disturbing 
the neighbors.

My Skull masks is a big full head mask, so the sound is traveling in a
kind 
of sphere. My voice saounds deeper and muffled somehow. I'd like to
reduce 
the "muffled", increase depth, but reduce volume, to spare my ears. I
think 
a bigger mask, with more space inside, and perhaps a few strategically 
placed holes could be better for the sound, make it less "this" or more 
"that".
I'd like to be more precise in my vocabulary and descirptions, but I'm
not 
yet a sound engineer.

Anyone care to help?





------------------------------

Message: 29
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:55:02 -0700
From: STEVE AXTELL <steve-AT-axtell.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes
To: steve-AT-axtell.com
Message-ID: <mailman.1208.1225598977.23657.puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>

These are ideas for a snowman Puppet on the Axtell Customer Forum...
http://www.network54.com/Forum/149423/thread/1222791966/last-1225597384/
Snowman+Puppet+ideas


Steve Axtell
Axtell Expressions, Inc.
  http://www.axtell.com
****************************************
Amazing Puppets & Magic


The original content of this email or attachment is ? Axtell
Expressions, Inc.


------------------------------

Message: 30
Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 00:53:36 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: [Puptcrit] review: All Hail You Mighty Lords of Nowhere!
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <8A7294E4272F4728B417BDBFB199A02F-AT-critter1>

Hi all.
Tonight I had the chance to see the show starring two of my favorite
among the puppets I made for others.
The show came to montreal, in a small venue, and it was quite an
experience.

My latest reviews have been mostly positive, and I used a lot of
"awesome" and "fantastic" and "cool" comments. 
This one is no exception, those words will still apply.

Show: All Hail You Mighty Lords of Nowhere!
Written, directed and performed by Alexander Winfield (Toronto).

To me, seeing a show with my own creations in it usually doesn't prevent
me from watching it with a critical mind. If anything, it just makes me
more difficult (iif not harsher), as I need to feel proud of my work and
what collaborators and customers make with it. This show exceeded my
expectations like you wouldn't believe. I shed tears twice, briefly.
Something hit closer to home than I would have thought possible. The
audience was so captivated,  at one point I wondered if we were indeed
being puppets ourselves, like one of the character was saying in the
show. 

The story is too much fun to spoil, so I'll just say this:
Two demons who conspired to bring about the end of the world (by the
human's own hands) are left alone on an empty cadaver and ruin-full
world, with only each other and their memories for company. 

It sounds rather sad and bleak, and it is at some points, but it's more
than justified. It IS about the end of the world after all! 

Alexander Winfield plays three very distinct characters (even down to
accents and voices) in alternance and sometimes they overlap
(physically, manipulating himself and a puppet), and not once does he
mix them up. It's like he really has three separate personalities.  It
gets very intense, the range of emotions he can project is big.
I had no idea a solo performer could do it as well.

The live music supports everything beautifully. Tonight it was performed
on keyboard and flute by multi-disciplined artist Kate Mior (mime,
circus performer, living statue, comic book artist). I can't remember
the name of the composer, but I'll ask tomorrow, and let you know.
You'll probably hear about that show soon, it should go places.

The puppets are suited to the atmosphere.
I won't say much more, as I'm their daddy, and can't really be objective
about them.

The set was minimal, and very appropriate: some sheets on the floor. A
high table with a cloth draped over it.
A very old tree on the table. The accessories: a plastic bottle, a book,
a DVD disk. The lights: one small desk lamp, one small yet powerful red
palm-sized lamp (probably LED). There were a few candles on the
audience's tables. With such lgithing, the puppets look even more alive
and expressive than I expected.  Winfield plays with shadows in some
scenes. One character posesses him, and one time he seems posessed while
he manipulates said character. Great use of his hole body.
It is a very verbal play, with monologues and reminescence, using mouth
puppets. Sometime this combo is too much for a puppet show, but not so
in this case. It works beautifully. The text captivates, builds up
momentum and leads us to the conclusion.

Not for children, probably not for some teenagers either. A few bad
words, but I'd be more concerned about the hard to grasp (or to swallow)
concepts like humanity's self-destructive behavior. Not a feel-good show
per say, yet I left happy, with a set of questions about humanity's
current directions on this small floating globe we call home.
A show with a Message, or a few messages, depengding on what you get out
of it.

As the puppetmaker, I feel I have to add:
I would be thrilled to work for Alexander Winfield again.
I hope my sharing of paper mache techniques with him won't make me
completely obsolete for his projects.
But if it does, I can't really mind, what a gain it will be for the
audience! 
What better puppet than one built for and by the performer?

Shameless plug: This show travels very light, and therefore it would be
easy to get to your venue and blow your people's minds.
I see it as a two-way crosser between Stage Theatre and Performance Art,
suitable for both kinds of situation.

------------------------------

Message: 31
Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 00:59:05 -0400
From: Mathieu Ren? <creaturiste-AT-primus.ca>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <1439348E715D494FB7ED77E870C88A0A-AT-critter1>
	reply-type=original

The Frosty puppet looks great!
Good Job, Steve and team!

Suggestion:
Wouldn't it be awesome if somehow, the snowman could physically grow?
Exchangeable lower body parts replaced in view (like a ballet of big 
snowballs, re-assembling under the head). Powerful rare-earth magnets
could 
hold him up very strongly at the middle points.




------------------------------

Message: 32
Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2008 07:03:10 -0800
From: STEVE AXTELL <steve-AT-axtell.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <mailman.1234.1225640269.23657.puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>

At 08:59 PM 11/1/2008, you wrote:
>The Frosty puppet looks great!
>Good Job, Steve and team!
>
>Suggestion:
>Wouldn't it be awesome if somehow, the snowman could physically grow?
>Exchangeable lower body parts replaced in view (like a ballet of big
>snowballs, re-assembling under the head). Powerful rare-earth magnets
could
>hold him up very strongly at the middle points.

Yeah... this one has a beach ball inside so it 
could inflate while it was "packed with snow" and 
it can "melt" at the end of a routine.

Another 3 ball approach could be used, I like 
it.  The balls could each be rolled on stage to 
music and stacked with the final head (the puppet 
part) put on as it springs to life....held 
together by the magnets.   Good idea!   I'll add 
that to the ideas and give you credit.   Ax



Steve Axtell
Axtell Expressions, Inc.
  http://www.axtell.com
****************************************
Amazing Puppets & Magic


The original content of this email or attachment is ? Axtell
Expressions, Inc.


------------------------------

Message: 33
Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2008 09:49:32 -0600
From: Chris Griffith <chris-AT-littlerednose.com>
Subject: [Puptcrit] Zipes titles
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <C533282C.2E97C%chris-AT-littlerednose.com>

I think I remember reading it in one of his classroom books, but I also
took
a 2-week class this last summer with Jack Ziipes where he lectured on
the
evils of professional storytellers.

Also - Peter Brosius is still in Minneapolis and can be reached through
the
Children's Theater Company, <http://www.childrenstheatre.org/>


-- 
Chris Griffith
Circus Minimus Puppetry
<http://www.littlerednose.com>
(612) 724-1435




------------------------------

Message: 34
Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 10:42:05 -0600
From: Brett Roberts <bdr1020-AT-hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes
To: <puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>
Message-ID: <COL106-W46B48D8DDEABA81AA7D198B8220-AT-phx.gbl>


Hey Steve, 
 
Mathieu's idea was almost exactly what we did at Six Flags over Texas.
Except it was a mascot style costume. I stayed in the largest ball.
Then, when the second one was in place, I would squeeze my body into
that. Then when the head was on, I would push my own head through. When
the hat was put on, I would pop out arms, step up and dance around. I
never got to rehearse this show, so the first time I stepped up the head
flew off into the audience. My head slipped into the middle section, so
it just looked like Frosty lost his head. I'm sure lots of kids needed
therapy after that. 
 
Keep up the fantastic work!
Brett Brett Roberts The Comedian for Kids
http://kidscomedian.com/Brett's school and library shows
http://learningwhilelaughing.com/Brett's Comedian for Kids Blog
http://kidscomedian.blogspot.com/ > Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2008 07:03:10
-0800> To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org> From: steve-AT-axtell.com> Subject: Re:
[Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes> > At 08:59 PM 11/1/2008, you
wrote:> >The Frosty puppet looks great!> >Good Job, Steve and team!> >>
>Suggestion:> >Wouldn't it be awesome if somehow, the snowman could
physically grow?> >Exchangeable lower body parts replaced in view (like
a ballet of big> >snowballs, re-assembling under the head). Powerful
rare-earth magnets could> >hold him up very strongly at the middle
points.> > Yeah... this one has a beach ball inside so it > could
inflate while it was "packed with snow" and > it can "melt" at the end
of a routine.> > Another 3 ball approach could be used, I like > it. The
balls could each be rolled on stage to > music and stacked with the
final head (the puppet > part) put on as it springs to life....held >
together by the magnets. Good idea! I'll add > that to the ideas and
give you credit. Ax> > > > Steve Axtell> Axtell Expressions, Inc.>
http://www.axtell.com> ****************************************> Amazing
Puppets & Magic> > > The original content of this email or attachment is
? Axtell Expressions, Inc.>
_______________________________________________> List address:
puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org> Admin interface:
http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit> Archives:
http://www.driftline.org

------------------------------

Message: 35
Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2008 08:50:59 -0800
From: STEVE AXTELL <steve-AT-axtell.com>
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & Jokes
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Message-ID: <mailman.1237.1225644939.23657.puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org>

HA!  That's funny.  Was that with Dewey?   Is 
that snowman concept a standard magical illusion, 
or something you guys dreamed up?   Did the balls 
have open holes that they rolled in away from the 
audience view, or did it have removable sections or doors to pass
through?   Ax


Ax


At 08:42 AM 11/2/2008, you wrote:

>Hey Steve,
>
>Mathieu's idea was almost exactly what we did at 
>Six Flags over Texas. Except it was a mascot 
>style costume. I stayed in the largest ball. 
>Then, when the second one was in place, I would 
>squeeze my body into that. Then when the head 
>was on, I would push my own head through. When 
>the hat was put on, I would pop out arms, step 
>up and dance around. I never got to rehearse 
>this show, so the first time I stepped up the 
>head flew off into the audience. My head slipped 
>into the middle section, so it just looked like 
>Frosty lost his head. I'm sure lots of kids needed therapy after that.
>
>Keep up the fantastic work!
>Brett Brett Roberts The Comedian for Kids 
>http://kidscomedian.com/Brett's school and 
>library shows 
>http://learningwhilelaughing.com/Brett's 
>Comedian for Kids Blog 
>http://kidscomedian.blogspot.com/ > Date: Sun, 2 
>Nov 2008 07:03:10 -0800> To: 
>puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org> From: steve-AT-axtell.com> 
>Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Snowman Puppet ideas & 
>Jokes> > At 08:59 PM 11/1/2008, you wrote:> >The 
>Frosty puppet looks great!> >Good Job, Steve and 
>team!> >> >Suggestion:> >Wouldn't it be awesome 
>if somehow, the snowman could physically 
>grow?> >Exchangeable lower body parts replaced 
>in view (like a ballet of big> >snowballs, 
>re-assembling under the head). Powerful 
>rare-earth magnets could> >hold him up very 
>strongly at the middle points.> > Yeah... this 
>one has a beach ball inside so it > could 
>inflate while it was "packed with snow" and > it 
>can "melt" at the end of a routine.> > Another 3 
>ball approach could be used, I like > it. The 
>balls could each be rolled on stage to > music 
>and stacked with the final head (the puppet > 
>part) put on as it springs to life....held > 
>together by the magnets. Good idea! I'll add > 
>that to the ideas and give you credit. Ax> > > > 
>Steve Axtell> Axtell Expressions, Inc.> 
>http://www.axtell.com> 
>****************************************> 
>Amazing Puppets & Magic> > > The original 
>content of this email or attachment is ? Axtell 
>Expressions, Inc.> 
>_______________________________________________> 
>List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org> Admin 
>interface: 
>http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit> 
>Archives: http://www.driftline.org
>_______________________________________________
>List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
>Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
>Archives: http://www.driftline.org


Steve Axtell
Axtell Expressions, Inc.
  http://www.axtell.com
****************************************
Amazing Puppets & Magic


The original content of this email or attachment is ? Axtell
Expressions, Inc.


------------------------------

_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org

End of puptcrit Digest, Vol 49, Issue 2
***************************************

_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org

   

Driftline Main Page

 

Display software: ArchTracker © Malgosia Askanas, 2000-2005