File puptcrit/puptcrit.0907, message 68


Date: Fri, 10 Jul 2009 19:11:28 EDT
To: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Subject: Re: [Puptcrit] Yale Puppeteers: where are the puppets now?






Well, Alan, you got me to take McPharlin down off the bookshelf, and that  
cost me a few hours of time, but it was very enjoyable since I hadn't looked 
at  it in a long time. See you soon at the festival.
 
      -Steven->
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/10/2009 6:46:09 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
alangregorycook-AT-msn.com writes:

Check page 482 and related  references in Paul McPharlin, PUPPET THEATRE IN 
AMERICA---Paul  gives  half a page to Yale Puppeteers in his list of 
puppeteers in North America.  There are not too many performers who got such a 
long listing. Harry was at  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1923. In their 
retirement years they got  mention in the Alumni magazine---I think mainly 
for the reiussue of Forman's  novel, "Better Angel". After it appeared, one 
homophobic alum complained in a  letter to the editor. So going to college 
does not guarantee you will get  educated unless your mind is open to begin 
with. 

As students, Harry  Burnett & company toured the area & also New England. 
Harry took  classes later at Yale Drama School, hence the name Puppeteers 
from Yale/ Yale  Puppeteers but they could just as easily have been called the 
Michigan  Puppeteers. When Detroit was still famous for building 
automobiles, it was  also one of the 5 dominant areas for puppetry in the United 
States. Tis nice  to know that the Yale Puppeteers contributed to that. And again 
to other  puppet centers (Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York). I'd have 
to check to  see if they visited Chicago on their National Tour---if so, 
they could claim  to have performed at all five of our primary puppet locales. 
If not, four out  of five is still impressive.

By the time Paul was issuing Puppetry  Yearbooks, beginning in 1930, the 
Yale Puppeteers were in California or New  York or Europe, but Paul was in 
contact with an astonishing number of  puppeteers including them. Since Paul's 
father was financially successful even  in the Great Depression years, Paul 
was able to make a vast contribution to us  puppeteers. No-body else did or 
could equal his work for puppetry.  

Phil Molby was not active when Harry & Forman began. But he could  have 
read about them in McPharlin's publications since Puppetry is a small  
universe. Paul published at least one short play by Forman.

Now I am  wondering what Yale puppets are at the Ballard Institute and what 
scripts are  there? John Bell can fill in here.

Forman did write scripts and music  after retirement for the Mitchell 
Marionettes, for Betsy Brown and for Charles  Taylor. He also wrote many songs 
(lyrics/music) for Elsa Lanchester which she  sang at the Turnabout Theater 
which opened in 1941 and lasted to the mid  1950s.. 

And to think that all this discussion began with Robert Rogers  asking 
about a book on Gustave Baumann. This is just another reason I think  the 
Baumann book is important to be in the libraries of  puppeteers.


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Well, Alan, you got me to take McPharlin down off the bookshelf, and that cost me a few hours of time, but it was very enjoyable since I hadn't looked at it in a long time. See you soon at the festival.
 
      -Steven->
 
 
In a message dated 7/10/2009 6:46:09 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, alangregorycook-AT-msn.com writes:
Check page 482 and related references in Paul McPharlin, PUPPET THEATRE IN AMERICA---Paul  gives half a page to Yale Puppeteers in his list of puppeteers in North America. There are not too many performers who got such a long listing. Harry was at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1923. In their retirement years they got mention in the Alumni magazine---I think mainly for the reiussue of Forman's novel, "Better Angel". After it appeared, one homophobic alum complained in a letter to the editor. So going to college does not guarantee you will get educated unless your mind is open to begin with.

As students, Harry Burnett & company toured the area & also New England. Harry took classes later at Yale Drama School, hence the name Puppeteers from Yale/ Yale Puppeteers but they could just as easily have been called the Michigan Puppeteers. When Detroit was still famous for building automobiles, it was also one of the 5 dominant areas for puppetry in the United States. Tis nice to know that the Yale Puppeteers contributed to that. And again to other puppet centers (Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York). I'd have to check to see if they visited Chicago on their National Tour---if so, they could claim to have performed at all five of our primary puppet locales. If not, four out of five is still impressive.

By the time Paul was issuing Puppetry Yearbooks, beginning in 1930, the Yale Puppeteers were in California or New York or Europe, but Paul was in contact with an astonishing number of puppeteers including them. Since Paul's father was financially successful even in the Great Depression years, Paul was able to make a vast contribution to us puppeteers. No-body else did or could equal his work for puppetry.

Phil Molby was not active when Harry & Forman began. But he could have read about them in McPharlin's publications since Puppetry is a small universe. Paul published at least one short play by Forman.

Now I am wondering what Yale puppets are at the Ballard Institute and what scripts are there? John Bell can fill in here.

Forman did write scripts and music after retirement for the Mitchell Marionettes, for Betsy Brown and for Charles Taylor. He also wrote many songs (lyrics/music) for Elsa Lanchester which she sang at the Turnabout Theater which opened in 1941 and lasted to the mid 1950s..

And to think that all this discussion began with Robert Rogers asking about a book on Gustave Baumann. This is just another reason I think the Baumann book is important to be in the libraries of puppeteers.


_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org
_______________________________________________
List address: puptcrit-AT-puptcrit.org
Admin interface: http://lists.puptcrit.org/mailman/listinfo/puptcrit
Archives: http://www.driftline.org


   

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