File spoon-archives/foucault.archive/foucault_2001/foucault.0111, message 12


Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2001 10:29:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: L'enonce /German influenced French guys..


Well, thank You Mr.Sari!
Lets say it diffrently: Lets talk about "Archeology of
Knowledge"! Is the group able to? I know that this is,
maybe after "Fineghan's awake" of Joyce, the most
difficult to be understood book, but since we are in
this group, we can try to discuss it?
At Least Stuart wrote a whole book about it!

Regrds!
Jivko 
--- Tanju SARI <tanjus-AT-superonline.com> wrote:
> From Foucault to Baudrilliard,French thinkers were
> deeply influenced by
> German Neo kantivist existiantilist relativity of
> Heiddegger
> ,Jaspers,etc..It is also interesting to note that
> their German is quite good
> especially the Baudrilliard's..He is also expert on
> German sociology..
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jivko Georgiev <jivkox43georgiev-AT-yahoo.com>
> To: foucault-AT-lists.village.virginia.edu
> <foucault-AT-lists.village.virginia.edu>
> Date: 05 Kasm 2001 Pazartesi 13:26
> Subject: Re: L'enonce and Heidegger
> 
> 
> >Im realy confused! I cant believe none in this
> group
> >is able to say something about the notion for
> >l'enonce.
> >Even Stuart Elden!
> >Is it that difficult?
> >Im realy strucked...
> >
> >Jivko
> >--- Jivko Georgiev <jivkox43georgiev-AT-yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> >> Hi all!
> >> In your opinion, is there some kind of
> connection,
> >> or
> >> relation, or influence between the theory of
> >> l'enonce
> >> (of Foucault) and The Being (of Heiddeger)? It
> seems
> >> to me that the theory of l'enonce is influenced
> by
> >> Heidegger, because the being of H. is somehow
> >> non-personal, anonymous and is previous in its
> >> relation with the concrete things.
> >> So is l'enonce of Foucault: it is non-personal
> >> ,previous and is  nessecary sircumstance for any
> >> serie
> >> of sighns to recieve understandable shape.
> >>
> >> In general, this theory reminds me of Heidegger.
> >> Please, let me know about your opinion! Ill
> >> appreciate
> >> it alot!
> >> Ofcourse, i cant pay you for your opinion, but if
> >> you
> >> insist, we can do something about it:-)))))))
> >>
> >> Regards!
> >> Jivko
> >>
> >>
> >> --- "Hennon, Lisa" <hennon-AT-arcadia.edu> wrote:
> >> > Lionel, you ask great questions.  I enjoy how
> >> others
> >> > have responded.  Here
> >> > is what I think.  Foucault's popularity and
> >> > notoriety has much to do with
> >> > what his intellectual contribution enabled
> others
> >> to
> >> > do.  I first read
> >> > Foucault by stumbling across one of his books
> in
> >> the
> >> > library.  I had never
> >> > heard of him, nor did I know how to say his
> name;
> >> > the title grabbed my
> >> > attention--The Order of Things.  (At the time,
> I
> >> > wanted somebody to please
> >> > tell me how things are ordered.)
> >> >
> >> > Fortunately (or not) for me, his work was
> >> beginning
> >> > to be translated into
> >> > English, and one of my professors later
> explained
> >> > that numerous European
> >> > authors were not made available to American
> >> readers
> >> > until the 1960s-70s.
> >> > Foucault remains a "notorious" figure for many
> >> > American university teachers
> >> > because their colleagues picked up his work as
> a
> >> way
> >> > to change the debates
> >> > in higher education.  The conversation has
> moved
> >> > away from Foucault's
> >> > detractors, so they talk about the "loss" or
> >> > "decline" or "grade inflation"
> >> > or whatever other term that suggests how
> dangerous
> >> > it is to read Foucault
> >> > and the other "french guys".
> >> >
> >> > Lisa
> >> >
> >> > -----Original Message-----
> >> > From: Lionel Boxer [mailto:lboxer-AT-hotmail.com]
> >> > Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2001 5:30 PM
> >> > To: foucault-AT-lists.village.virginia.edu
> >> > Subject: Foucault's popularity
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Does anyone agree with this?  Does anyone
> >> disagree?
> >> >
> >> > Not to diminish Foucault's intellectucal
> >> > contribution.
> >> >
> >> > Perhaps his popularity could be explained by
> his
> >> > proactive and high profile
> >> > social activism that contributed to his
> >> popularity.
> >> >
> >> > He provided theory and practice for resistance,
> >> but
> >> > more important he led by
> >> >
> >> > example.  He was a total force in that regard;
> >> > perhaps even a movement.
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
>
>_________________________________________________________________
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> >>
> >>
> >>
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> >
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> >
> 


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