File spoon-archives/french-feminism.archive/french-feminism_2001/french-feminism.0111, message 18


Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2001 10:01:29 +0000
Subject: Re: irigaray & colour



Many thanks for allowing the rest of us "in" on this discussion. I have
recently started looking anew at the work of Jungian psychotherapist,
Marion Woodman. Coming from an entirely different perspective, I suspect
she is very much on same journey as Irigaray. Has anyone looked at this?  
Happy Thanksgiving 

Mary Condren

At 02:08 22/11/2001 EST, you wrote:
>Hello Hilary,
> 
> In a message dated 11/18/2001 10:55:21 AM Central Standard Time,
>h.robinson-AT-ulst.ac.uk writes:
> 
> 
> Hi Simone
> 
> Good to hear from you - I know of those references in Irigaray's work 
> - and look forward to the translation of Between East and West, due 
> to be published soon. 
>
> 
> Fantastic!
> 
> I was wondering if anyone has written on this 
> strand in Irigaray's work - and would love to see a copy of your 
> paper, if that would be possible. (maybe send it to my private email 
> address, but continue the conversation on-list?).
>
> 
> 
>         Most perplexing.
> 
> 
> 
>  My own thesis was on the implications of Irigaray's work for 
> contemporary feminist art practices and criticism. In begining to 
> theorize the artwork as mediation between artist and audience, in an 
> intersubjective relation (rather than, as is usual in art theory, 
> reading the artwork as an object in subject-object relation to both 
> artist and audience - or artwork as symptom) the work on buddhism was 
> very useful. 
>
> 
>        
> 
> 
> My partner is an artist and has practiced rinzai zen (an 
> austere Japanese form) for over 30 years, so I used his extensive 
> library to help me find readings of, for example, the passages where 
> LI discusses buddha and the flower. 
>
> 
> Ah, well, then, you will likely find yourself correcting me on some of my
>argument and interpretation.
> 
> However, I did feel a little 
> isolated in this! it is an aspect of her work that commentators tend 
> to skirt. I'm now working on turning my thesis into a book, and wish 
> to re-address this material, particularly in the light of recent 
> translations.
>
> 
>              W! e had better hurry up and get our work out there to
publish. 
> 
> 
> And of course her mentions of colour are totally apposite for any 
> discussion of visual art - Flesh Colours is the main essay, though 
> there are other mentions through the work. Again, it's not something 
> that folk seem to have engaged with.
> I'd love to know what your thoughts are - particularly on her 
> discussions of Buddhism -
>
> 
>       I would be delighted.
> 
> Be well,
> Simone
> 
> ^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*
> In the face of laughter, nothing can stand.
>                   Mark Twain
> 
> Our glances, our smiles, are spent; laughs
> exude from all our mouths; our blood flows
> and we extend ourselves without ever reaching
> an end; we never hold back our thoughts,
> our signs, our writing; and we're not afraid
> of lacking.
>                   Helen Cixous
> 
> Simone Roberts, Ph. D. Candidate, A.B.D.
> Humanities: Studies in Literature
> University of Texas-Dallas
> 
>       "in Literature" means:
> (19th and 20th Century European 
> and American Poetics and Literature,
> Literary Theory, and Feminist Philosophy,
> all with a "History of Ideas" flava)
> 



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