File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 107


Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2003 18:57:04 +1000
Subject: Re: Fear.  POSTSCRIPT ON DEMOCRACY


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--Boundary_(ID_2GvuaFYYRlm6gQDaqCAhSg)

I found some statistics while searching for  "The Silent Takeover: Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy", by Noreena Hertz. 

The book is supposed to be old news in Europe, and some of you may have opinions?

The Wal-Mart family billionaires, there are five, if memory serves, are in the top ten of about 440 billionaires it the U.S.  Walmart is also famous for preventing Union organizing, and has been charged with forcing employees to work overtime without pay.

Statistics:

Of the world's 100 largest economies, fifty-one are now corporations, only forty-nine are nation-states. The sales of General Motors and Ford are greater than the GDP (gross domestic product) of the whole of sub-Saharan Africa, and Wal-Mart now has a turnover higher than the revenues of most of the states of Eastern Europe. Yet few of us are fully aware of the growing dominance of big business: newspapers continue to place news of the actions of governments on the front page, with business news relegated to the inside pages. But do governments really have more influence over our lives than businesses? Do the parties for which we vote have any real freedom of choice in their actions?

regards,

Hugh

--Boundary_(ID_2GvuaFYYRlm6gQDaqCAhSg)

HTML VERSION:

I found some statistics while searching for  "The Silent Takeover: Global Capitalism and the Death of Democracy", by Noreena Hertz. 

The book is supposed to be old news in Europe, and some of you may have opinions?

The Wal-Mart family billionaires, there are five, if memory serves, are in the top ten of about 440 billionaires it the U.S.  Walmart is also famous for preventing Union organizing, and has been charged with forcing employees to work overtime without pay.

Statistics:

Of the world's 100 largest economies, fifty-one are now corporations, only forty-nine are nation-states. The sales of General Motors and Ford are greater than the GDP (gross domestic product) of the whole of sub-Saharan Africa, and Wal-Mart now has a turnover higher than the revenues of most of the states of Eastern Europe. Yet few of us are fully aware of the growing dominance of big business: newspapers continue to place news of the actions of governments on the front page, with business news relegated to the inside pages. But do governments really have more influence over our lives than businesses? Do the parties for which we vote have any real freedom of choice in their actions?

regards,

Hugh

--Boundary_(ID_2GvuaFYYRlm6gQDaqCAhSg)--

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