File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 140


Subject: RE: terms
Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2003 19:34:57 -0600


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.


            Hugh wrote:
 
More and more I realize that reading philosophy is not a substitute for
physical experience, although it has its uses, which are, as you say,
language-limited.  Yes, reading philosophy can further the goal of
understanding, and understanding can be a great satisfaction.  
 
Hugh, 
 
One of the things that attracts me to ancient philosophy, especially
that of the Epicureans, Stoics, and Cynics, is that for them philosophy
was a good deal more than theory. It had everything to do with how one
lived one's life. Philosophy back then was a viable and respectable
alternative to religion and god.
 
I am still trying to figure how to do this today since we live in a time
when economics forces us to live against our inclinations.  I just read
a quote where someone said - to be socialist means to favor the social
over economics.
 
I admit I personally find it difficult to live 'heroically' outside the
pressures of the kind of world economics dictates and, yet, I feel
profoundly conflicted and even Kafkaesque, living within such a world.
My only hope is that others younger than me will find the strength to
resist this world more than I have.  
 
I sometimes feel like a canary inside a golden cage trapped inside a
coal mine.  In times like these, every song echoes death.
 
eric
 
 
 

HTML VERSION:

style='tab-interval:.5in'>

            Hugh wrote:

 

More and more I realize that reading philosophy is not a substitute for physical experience, although it has its uses, which are, as you say, language-limited.  Yes, reading philosophy can further the goal of understanding, and understanding can be a great satisfaction. 

 

Hugh,

 

One of the things that attracts me to ancient philosophy, especially that of the Epicureans, Stoics, and Cynics, is that for them philosophy was a good deal more than theory. It had everything to do with how one lived one’s life. Philosophy back then was a viable and respectable alternative to religion and god.

 

I am still trying to figure how to do this today since we live in a time when economics forces us to live against our inclinations.  I just read a quote where someone said – to be socialist means to favor the social over economics.

 

I admit I personally find it difficult to live ‘heroically’ outside the pressures of the kind of world economics dictates and, yet, I feel profoundly conflicted and even Kafkaesque, living within such a world.  My only hope is that others younger than me will find the strength to resist this world more than I have. 

 

I sometimes feel like a canary inside a golden cage trapped inside a coal mine.  In times like these, every song echoes death.

 

eric

 

 

 


Driftline Main Page

 

Display software: ArchTracker © Malgosia Askanas, 2000-2005