File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 145


Date: Wed, 26 Feb 2003 11:27:18 +1000
Subject: Our Spectacle, Whose media?


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--Boundary_(ID_jSW7arWZyXr4bQOJiLEf1w)

All,

The Authors of  "Our Media, not Theirs",  interviewed on PBS, told how corporate media influenc Congress to give away public rights to TV and Radio moguls. The ownership of TV media by AOL, GE, Disney, and others,  is common knowledge.  The fact that a Texas company owning 1200 radio stations in numerous States makes deals with advertisers to drive out a few remaining independent stations was news to me.

With difficulty I found a book review that at least gave an inkling of its content -see below:

Our Media not Theirs: The Democratic Struggle Against Corporate Media
Robert W. McChesney & John Nichols
Seven Stories Press =A37.99, pp128

This short book puts a pithy, well-argued case for the idea that the free media is disappearing. McChesney and Nichols write solely about the US, but we are left in no doubt that they would see similar dark forces at work in the UK if they turned their gaze our way. Ten conglomerates, including Disney, AOL, Time Warner, and Sony, own all the television stations, the Hollywood studios, and most of the music industry. That journalistic standards have all but vanished, they argue, is evidenced by authoritarian China being happy to let almost all US news coverage inside its borders. All this adds up to an exposure of the paradox at the heart of democratic, capitalist countries: there can be no personal freedom, and no free market, without stringent regulation of both. But some hope remains: the BBC is still banned in China.



regards,
Hugh

--Boundary_(ID_jSW7arWZyXr4bQOJiLEf1w)

HTML VERSION:

All,

The Authors of  "Our Media, not Theirs",  interviewed on PBS, told how corporate media influenc Congress to give away public rights to TV and Radio moguls. The ownership of TV media by AOL, GE, Disney, and others,  is common knowledge.  The fact that a Texas company owning 1200 radio stations in numerous States makes deals with advertisers to drive out a few remaining independent stations was news to me.

With difficulty I found a book review that at least gave an inkling of its content -see below:

Our Media not Theirs: The Democratic Struggle Against Corporate Media
Robert W. McChesney & John Nichols
Seven Stories Press =A37.99, pp128

This short book puts a pithy, well-argued case for the idea that the free media is disappearing. McChesney and Nichols write solely about the US, but we are left in no doubt that they would see similar dark forces at work in the UK if they turned their gaze our way. Ten conglomerates, including Disney, AOL, Time Warner, and Sony, own all the television stations, the Hollywood studios, and most of the music industry. That journalistic standards have all but vanished, they argue, is evidenced by authoritarian China being happy to let almost all US news coverage inside its borders. All this adds up to an exposure of the paradox at the heart of democratic, capitalist countries: there can be no personal freedom, and no free market, without stringent regulation of both. But some hope remains: the BBC is still banned in China.

 
regards,
Hugh
 
--Boundary_(ID_jSW7arWZyXr4bQOJiLEf1w)--

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