File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 36


Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 18:16:35 +1000
Subject: Re: Fear.


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--Boundary_(ID_iUkMy+KmJxB2TVAC1WY1hA)

Glen/All,

Thanks, for a clear, explicit, courageous, description of a fear that is not uncommon.  It may be helpful to parents of children who have such problems and  to others of  us who fear speaking to a large group.

~^*^~^*^~^*~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~*^~^*~^*

^+! The intro to 
the book "The Politics of Everyday Fear" ed by Massumi can be
> read here:
> 
> http://www.anu.edu.au/HRC/first_and_last/works/feartoc.htm
> 
> The trauma you speak of seems it would initially be one of Badiou's events
> (event-uating the possibility of another reality/ possible world). The echo
> of the event is very interesting... I do not know enough about
> psychoanalysis to have a play with that idea though...
> 
> David Altheide suggests there is a difference between 'risks and danger' as
> a signification of possible harm and 'fear' that is the emotional response
> to an imminent harm that should be avoided (188): "Risks and danger signify
> an awareness of potential harm, and they are often associated with specific
> acts or objects. [.] Fear is much different. It is an emotion. It is a
> general orientation that harm is imminent and that steps should be taken to
> avoid the source of fear [.]" (188). Altheide, David L. Creating Fear :News
> and the Construction of Crisis. New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 2002.
> 
> I theorised fear in terms of being an essential element in the technologies
> of control utilised by the State to generate 'docile' car-drivers
> (Commuters), so your example of the post-adolescent was great as it
> supported by general thesis (which was not about Commuters and fear, and
> more about Hoons (the reckless driving post-ad.) and different kinds of
> fear, mainly of a caged oblivion. I would argue they (hoons) are not
> apathetic, just that they have empathy and emotional investment in fields
> that wouldn't make much sense to the Commuter).
> 
> Anyway... when a risk becomes a fear the ability to 'think' (in a critical
> Deleuzian sense) is lost, and conditioning takes over. Fear is an
> interesting intersection of the virtual and actual. Where the risk may seem
> to be (and probably is!) fully real it is albeit virtual, however, 'fear'
> processes this risk into an imminent and actual danger.
> 
> A personal example is that I used to have a terrible stutter. I could hardly
> speak, and I am not sure how much this has effected me over the years. I
> have never encountered anything else quite like the feeling of knowing
> exactly what you want to say (the words, the spelling and meaning of the
> words) but simply not having the physical ability to speak them. (Except
> maybe when speaking to a pretty girl;) I still do to some extent however I
> 'manage' my stutter so that I calculate the risk of stuttering (or having a
> 'block') on certain words and manipulate the rhythms and selection of my
> spoken words to minimise the disjunctive rhythms of my speech impediment.
> 
> However, the fear I have of stuttering is actualised by/into a visceral
> reaction (panic, sweating, further stuttering, etc), when I begin to stutter
> or know that I am particularly susceptible to a block or a stutter (ie when
> very tired), so that I am fearful of 'actually' stuttering (and not
> necessarily the effects of the stuttering). It can be quite painful
> 'choosing' every single word while maintaining 'normal' rhythms of speech,
> so much so that when I am not tired I speak very very fast (haha)... I have
> been somewhat successful returning to my managing my speech through
> calculating risks even when the fear of stuttering/blocking grips me, so
> that I force myself to 'forget' my fear (break the feedback loop generated
> that amplifies my visceral reaction) and relate to the words I speak on the
> level of a calculated risk. A bit like a politician I suspect...
> 
> I don't know if this is at all helpful?
> 
> Glen.

--Boundary_(ID_iUkMy+KmJxB2TVAC1WY1hA)

HTML VERSION:

Glen/All,
 
Thanks, for a clear, explicit, courageous, description of a fear that is not uncommon.  It may be helpful to parents of children who have such problems and  to others of  us who fear speaking to a large group.
~^*^~^*^~^*~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~*^~^*~^*
 
^+! The intro to
the book "The Politics of Everyday Fear" ed by Massumi can be
> read here:
>
>
http://www.anu.edu.au/HRC/first_and_last/works/feartoc.htm
>
> The trauma you speak of seems it would initially be one of Badiou's events
> (event-uating the possibility of another reality/ possible world). The echo
> of the event is very interesting... I do not know enough about
> psychoanalysis to have a play with that idea though...
>
> David Altheide suggests there is a difference between 'risks and danger' as
> a signification of possible harm and 'fear' that is the emotional response
> to an imminent harm that should be avoided (188): "Risks and danger signify
> an awareness of potential harm, and they are often associated with specific
> acts or objects. [.] Fear is much different. It is an emotion. It is a
> general orientation that harm is imminent and that steps should be taken to
> avoid the source of fear [.]" (188). Altheide, David L. Creating Fear :News
> and the Construction of Crisis. New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 2002.
>
> I theorised fear in terms of being an essential element in the technologies
> of control utilised by the State to generate 'docile' car-drivers
> (Commuters), so your example of the post-adolescent was great as it
> supported by general thesis (which was not about Commuters and fear, and
> more about Hoons (the reckless driving post-ad.) and different kinds of
> fear, mainly of a caged oblivion. I would argue they (hoons) are not
> apathetic, just that they have empathy and emotional investment in fields
> that wouldn't make much sense to the Commuter).
>
> Anyway... when a risk becomes a fear the ability to 'think' (in a critical
> Deleuzian sense) is lost, and conditioning takes over. Fear is an
> interesting intersection of the virtual and actual. Where the risk may seem
> to be (and probably is!) fully real it is albeit virtual, however, 'fear'
> processes this risk into an imminent and actual danger.
>
> A personal example is that I used to have a terrible stutter. I could hardly
> speak, and I am not sure how much this has effected me over the years. I
> have never encountered anything else quite like the feeling of knowing
> exactly what you want to say (the words, the spelling and meaning of the
> words) but simply not having the physical ability to speak them. (Except
> maybe when speaking to a pretty girl;) I still do to some extent however I
> 'manage' my stutter so that I calculate the risk of stuttering (or having a
> 'block') on certain words and manipulate the rhythms and selection of my
> spoken words to minimise the disjunctive rhythms of my speech impediment.
>
> However, the fear I have of stuttering is actualised by/into a visceral
> reaction (panic, sweating, further stuttering, etc), when I begin to stutter
> or know that I am particularly susceptible to a block or a stutter (ie when
> very tired), so that I am fearful of 'actually' stuttering (and not
> necessarily the effects of the stuttering). It can be quite painful
> 'choosing' every single word while maintaining 'normal' rhythms of speech,
> so much so that when I am not tired I speak very very fast (haha)... I have
> been somewhat successful returning to my managing my speech through
> calculating risks even when the fear of stuttering/blocking grips me, so
> that I force myself to 'forget' my fear (break the feedback loop generated
> that amplifies my visceral reaction) and relate to the words I speak on the
> level of a calculated risk. A bit like a politician I suspect...
>
> I don't know if this is at all helpful?
>
> Glen.
--Boundary_(ID_iUkMy+KmJxB2TVAC1WY1hA)--

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