File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 46


Date: Thu, 13 Feb 2003 13:17:52 +1000
Subject: Re: what is at stake with fear?


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--Boundary_(ID_vlac4XPJ2g7bGPV9aMZ6EA)

Steve/All,

IMHO fear in the human organism is a biological trait evolved during the history of homo-sapiens and antecedent species.  It is a spontaneous personal response to life-threatening danger, and may mean the difference between death and survival.

Fear of war and terrorists is - like the Spectacle and Advertising - promoted worldwide by governments (and corporations who influence governments) to further the plutocratic ambitions of individuals who own and/or control those those institutions.

regards,
Hugh

~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^ 



In the Dialectic Of Enlightenment Adorno and Horkheimer  say Nothing at all
> may remain outside, because the very idea of outsideness is the very source
> of fear It is this which marks the very core of Western thought. The
> source of this notion of fear is that world is alien and other  the other
> hear being marked by the notion of the other derived from psychoanlysis 
> not as has been suggested at times the same alien and other as understood by
> Levinas but that is another approach. Elsewhere in Negative dialectics and
> obviously following this line of thought Adorno refers to idealism as rage
> once again referring to a world that is simply to alien and other to be
> dominated. Idealism as Adorno defines and understands it, is rage against
> the otherness of the natural and perhaps unnatural world, which cannot be
> dominated by the mind of humans. It does seem to me that Adorno (and
> Horkheimer) particularism, his "negative dialectic" with it's
> psychoanalytical understanding of the other helps point towards a way of
> addressing the particular issue of fear, as derived from the society we
> exist within. 
> 
> Does this placing of fear in the frame of the western tradition help in
> clarifying what is philosophically at stake here? Do we following the great
> critique of the dominant western tradition need to place "fear" in a
> different philosophical context? 
> 
> 
> regards
> steve
> 

--Boundary_(ID_vlac4XPJ2g7bGPV9aMZ6EA)

HTML VERSION:

Steve/All,
 
IMHO fear in the human organism is a biological trait evolved during the history of homo-sapiens and antecedent species.  It is a spontaneous personal response to life-threatening danger, and may mean the difference between death and survival.
 
Fear of war and terrorists is - like the Spectacle and Advertising - promoted worldwide by governments (and corporations who influence governments) to further the plutocratic ambitions of individuals who own and/or control those those institutions.
 
regards,
Hugh
 

~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^*^~^

 

In the Dialectic Of Enlightenment Adorno and Horkheimer  say Nothing at all
> may remain outside, because the very idea of outsideness is the very source
> of fear It is this which marks the very core of Western thought. The
> source of this notion of fear is that world is alien and other  the other
> hear being marked by the notion of the other derived from psychoanlysis
> not as has been suggested at times the same alien and other as understood by
> Levinas but that is another approach. Elsewhere in Negative dialectics and
> obviously following this line of thought Adorno refers to idealism as rage
> once again referring to a world that is simply to alien and other to be
> dominated. Idealism as Adorno defines and understands it, is rage against
> the otherness of the natural and perhaps unnatural world, which cannot be
> dominated by the mind of humans. It does seem to me that Adorno (and
> Horkheimer) particularism, his "negative dialectic" with it's
> psychoanalytical understanding of the other helps point towards a way of
> addressing the particular issue of fear, as derived from the society we
> exist within.
>
> Does this placing of fear in the frame of the western tradition help in
> clarifying what is philosophically at stake here? Do we following the great
> critique of the dominant western tradition need to place "fear" in a
> different philosophical context?
>
>
> regards
> steve
>

--Boundary_(ID_vlac4XPJ2g7bGPV9aMZ6EA)--

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