File spoon-archives/lyotard.archive/lyotard_2003/lyotard.0302, message 92


Subject: Ethics
Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 21:20:12 -0600


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In my ongoing project of reading Macleod's novels in the order they were
published, I am finally up to "The Cassini Division." The book starts
out with a quote from Joseph Dietzgen which seems strangely relevant to
the current ethical discussion:
 
"Man is a living personality, whose welfare and purpose is embodied
within himself, who has between himself and the world nothing but his
needs as a mediator, who owes no allegiance to any law whatever from the
moment that it contravenes his needs.  The moral duty of an individual
never exceeds his interests.  The only thing which exceeds those
interests is the material power of the generality over the
individuality."
 
What do you think about this statement? Is it defensible?
 
eric
 

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In my ongoing project of reading Macleod’s novels in the order they were published, I am finally up to “The Cassini Division.” The book starts out with a quote from Joseph Dietzgen which seems strangely relevant to the current ethical discussion:

 

“Man is a living personality, whose welfare and purpose is embodied within himself, who has between himself and the world nothing but his needs as a mediator, who owes no allegiance to any law whatever from the moment that it contravenes his needs.  The moral duty of an individual never exceeds his interests.  The only thing which exceeds those interests is the material power of the generality over the individuality.”

 

What do you think about this statement? Is it defensible?

 

eric

 


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