File spoon-archives/nietzsche.archive/nietzsche_2000/nietzsche.0001, message 14


Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 12:13:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: Truth and the enahncement of the quality of life


<Daniel wrote>

The will to power has nothing to do with truth it is
about life and in some strange way that is the highest truth, but the point
is to leave logic and reason out of the equation and place instinct as the
highest priority against them.
Nietzsche objects to Christianity, since it denies the value of the
instincts, which are based in part on the physical world.  Instinct is a
product of the body and the mind (Nietzsche does not see them separately).
Christianity solely wants to concentrate on the mind.  So Christianity is
life-denying, because it does not include the physical and devalues it
through its teachings.

.....

Right. The rest of your presentation was nice as well, but... what do you
mean when you say instinct? For some reason I have this overpowering
intuitive feeling that Nietzsche never mentions that at all. The Dionesian
will to get intoxicated, to dance on tables, or to engage in some sort of
debauchery is not necessarily instinctual. As far as 'instinct', for
Nietzsche it is probably not the same as the Dionesian (the partner of
Appolonian) aspect of human nature and it seems to me that N. was an
advocate of a _balance_ between the Appolonian and the Dionesian.  He was
not an advocate of a 'Dionesian' lifestyle. N. lashed out against
Christianity, amongst other reasons, because he observed the lack of this
equilibrium in Christian dogma and its practitioners.  I seriously doubt
that N. held Christinity in contempt because Christians were reasonable and
logical people. But maybe I am wrong and you meant something else?
-michal

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