File spoon-archives/phillitcrit.archive/phillitcrit_1998/phillitcrit.9811, message 4


Date: Wed, 11 Nov 1998 11:57:13 -0500
Subject: PLC: CFP: Comparative Literature Symposium 



> Date: Tue, 10 Nov 1998 13:48:07 +0100
> From: Sharon Diane Nell <n7sdn-AT-TTACS.TTU.EDU>
> Subject: Call for Papers: Comparative Literature Symposium
> 
> -------------------------     CALL FOR PAPERS
> ----------------------------
> 
> Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain
> 
>            The 32nd Annual Comparative Literature Symposium
>                       Texas Tech University
>                       February 4-6, 1999
>                 (http://www.ttu.edu/~complit/LitPsych.html)
> 
> The primary focus of the conference will be on the interplay between
> psychological, philosophical, and literary approaches to examining the
> central role of narrative in the formation and function of
> consciousness. Following from the work of the philosopher Owen Flanagan,
> our intent will be to engender a collaborative examination of
> consciousness that is sensitive to phenomenological seeming, yet
> constrained by empirical findings in
> psychology.
> 
> SPEAKERS:
> Owen Flanagan, Duke University
> Carol Shields, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novelist
> Lawrence Langer, Simmons College
> Mark Freeman, Holy Cross
> James Phelan, Ohio State University
> Katherine Nelson, CUNY
> Sidonie A. Smith, Michigan
> David C. Rubin, Duke
> Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Virginia Tech
> 
> Send one-page abstracts for 20-minute presentations or panel proposals
> by November 15, 1998, to:
> 
> Literature:
> Psychology:
> Ted E. McVay                                    Gary D. Fireman
> Classical & Modern Languages                    Dept. of Psychology
> Texas Tech University                           Texas Tech University
> Lubbock, TX  79409-2071                         Lubbock, TX  79409-2051
> t-mcvay-AT-ttu.edu                                 g.fireman-AT-ttu.edu
> 
>         For more information, visit the TTU Comp Lit web page at
>                 http://www.ttu.edu/~complit/LitPsych.html
> 
>       -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>                                                     CALL FOR PAPERS
> 
>                                              Narrative and Consciousness:
>                                          Literature, Psychology, and the Brain
> 
>                                    The 32nd Annual Comparative Literature Symposium
>                                                  Texas Tech University
>                                                   February 4-6, 1999
> 
>                                           For registration info, click here.
> 
> The primary focus of the conference will be on the interplay between psychological, philosophical, and literary
> approaches to examining the central role of narrative in the formation and function of consciousness. Following from
> the work of the philosopher Owen Flanagan, our intent will be to engender a collaborative examination of consciousness
> that is sensitive to phenomenological seeming, yet constrained by empirical findings in psychology. To that end, we
> have invited the speakers in the attached list--ranging from philosophers of science and mind to cognitive and
> developmental psychologists to literary theorists of narrative and autobiography to a noted novelist whose work
> explores the phenomenal origins and nature of consciousness--to engage in a dialogue that charts a naturalistic
> approach to the questions of why phenomenal consciousness as experienced in personal narrative is so important, and
> how it can be understood from the multiple perspectives of contemporary neuroscience, cognitive science, and
> developmental psychology.
> 
> Owen Flanagan, Professor (and Chair) of Philosophy, Professor of Psychology and Professor of Neurobiology; Adjunct
> Prof. of Literature, Duke University. Author of Consciousness Reconsidered; Science of the Mind; and Self Expressions.
> 
> Carol Shields, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries (also winner of the National Book Critics Circle
> Award and the Governor General's Award of Canada; nominated for the Booker Prize). Other novels: Happenstance; The
> Republic of Love; Swann; The Orange Fish; Small Ceremonies (winner of the Canadian Authors' Association Award for
> Fiction); and The Box Garden.
> 
> Lawrence Langer, 1991 National Book Critics Circle Award, Eugene M. Kayden Press Prize for the most distinguished book
> in the humanities for Holocaust Testimonies: The Ruins of Memory. Other books include: Pre-empting the Holocaust and
> Other Essays; Landscapes of Jewish Experience; The Holocaust and the Literary Imagination and The Age of Atrocity:
> Death in Modern Literature.
> 
> Mark Freeman, Professor of Psychology, Associate Dean, College of Holy
> Cross, author of Rewriting the Self: History, Memory, and Narrative and
> Finding the Muse: A Sociopsychological Inquiry into the Conditions of
> Artistic Creativity.
> 
> Katherine Nelson, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, The Graduate School of City University of New York, author of
> Language in Cognitive Development: The Emergence of the Mediated Mind; editor of Narratives from the Crib.
> 
> David C. Rubin, Professor of Psychology, Duke University, author of Memory in Oral Tradition:The Cognitive Psychology
> of Epic, Ballads, and Counting-out Rhymes (William James Award from APA, American Assoc. of Publishers Best New
> Professional Scholarly Book in Psychology); editor of Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory.
> 
> James Phelan, Professor and Chair of English, The Ohio State University, author of Narrative as Rhetoric: Technique,
> Audiences, Ethics, Ideology; Reading People, Reading Plots: Character, Progression, and the Interpretation of
> Narrative;Worlds from Words: A Theory of Language in Fiction; founding editor of award- winning journal, Narrative.
> 
> Sidonie A. Smith, Professor of English and Director of Women's Studies, University of Michigan, author of
> Subjectivity, Identity and the Body: Women's Autobiographical Practices in the Twentieth Century; Women's
> Autobiography: Marginality and the Fictions of Self-Representation.
> 
> Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Virginia Tech, author of Locating Consciousness.
> 
> Publication venues for selected papers (based on a critical review process):
> 
>      An edited book of essays
>      Special issue of the Journal of Constructivist Psychology
>      Special issue of the comparative literature journal Intertexts
> 
> Send one-page abstracts for 20-minute presentations or panel proposals by November 15, 1998, to:
> 
>                     Literature:
>                     Ted E. McVay
>                     Classical & Modern Languages
>                     Texas Tech University
>                     Lubbock, TX 79409-2071
>                     t-mcvay-AT-ttu.edu
> 
>                     Psychology:
>                     Gary D. Fireman
>                     Dept. of Psychology
>                     Texas Tech University
>                     Lubbock, TX 79409-2051
>                     g.fireman-AT-ttu.edu
> 
> (Registration, Lodging and Transportation information will be made available here at a later date.)
> 
>                                       Webpage created by Sharon Diane Nell, Ph.D.
>                                               e-mail: n7sdn-AT-ttacs.ttu.edu
>                                                  Last update: 5/27/98


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